Yaz, Yasmin Blood-Clotting Allegation Lawsuits Help: Resource4thePeople Supports Calls by Women’s Groups for Stronger Warnings on Labels

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As more concerns are being raised about allegations of blood-clotting, consolidated federal lawsuits continue to be settled. Resource4thePeople also announces its national network of attorneys will continue to offer free consultations for consumers about seeking compensation over blood-clotting allegations.

http://www.resource4thepeople.com/defectivedrugs/yasmin.html

Resource4thePeople announced today its support of calls by women’s groups for stronger label warnings over allegations that popular birth control pills Yaz and Yasmin may cause serious blood-clotting problems.

The two oral contraceptives already are named in thousands of federal Yaz and Yasmin lawsuits* alleging that the use of the oral contraceptives caused women to suffer life-threatening blood-clotting issues. Many of these federal lawsuits have been consolidated before Judge David R. Herndon in the U.S. District Court in the Southern District of Illinois.

However, as a Sept. 15, 2013 article** in the Chicago Tribune points out, federal officials are being asked to escalate warnings about possible blood-clotting problems associated with the contraceptives and at least one consumer non-profit organization has called for the products to be pulled from the marketplace.

“The concerns raised by women’s and consumer groups center focus on the same allegations made in the Yaz and Yasmin lawsuits --- that the use of these birth control pills may increase the risk of blood-clotting problems that have allegedly caused deaths and life-threatening side effects to the women who use them,” said Resource4thePeople.

“We fully support any effort to increase the warning levels of labels and any other medical information that apply to Yaz and Yasmin in order to allow women to make informed decisions about what health risks may be involved with the use of these contraceptives.”

Resource4thePeople also announced that even though the multidistrict litigation before Judge Herndon has been underway for several years new cases will continue to be reviewed and other women still may be eligible to file their own Yaz or Yasmin lawsuit over similar allegations.

"Our national network of attorneys will continue to be available to provide free consultations for women are seeking information about their legal rights to seek compensation over these allegations," said Resource4thePeople.

The Chicago Tribune article questioned the effectiveness and safety of Yaz and Yasmin contraceptives and cited increased concern about the products from women’s groups:

“Some women's health advocates want a stronger, black-box warning that is more likely to be noticed,” the Tribune reported. “The advocacy group Public Citizen, meanwhile, has placed drugs containing drospirenone — including Yaz, Yasmin, Gianvi and Zarah — on its ‘do not use’ list because they ‘can cause increased blood levels of potassium and (are) no more effective than other oral contraceptives in preventing pregnancy.’ On the Internet, people who call themselves ‘Yaz survivors’ post accounts of their experiences.

The article also quoted Diana Zuckerman, president of the National Research Center for Women & Families who said Yaz and Yasmin “shouldn't be on the market because there are so many safer alternatives. We can debate how unsafe it is and for whom — more research could obviously clarify that — but there's really no doubt that it's not as safe as dozens of other birth control pills."

Resrouce4thePeople notes that Bayer Pharmaceuticals -- the company that manufactured and marketed Yaz and Yasmin -- confirmed in its Feb. 28, 2013 annual report*** that many of these cases are in the process of being settled.

"As of February 12, 2013, Bayer had reached agreements, without admission of liability, to settle the claims of approximately 4,800 claims," according to the Bayer annual report.

Bayer also has agreed to pay up to $24 million to settle other lawsuits in the multidistrict litigation involving allegations over gall bladder side effects, according to the court file.

These settlements are a different component of this consolidated litigation in Illinois in which plaintiffs claimed that they suffered gall bladder injuries because they used Yaz and Yasmin as contraceptives.

Meanwhile, Reuters News Service reported**** March 20, 2013 that the settlements also include Yaz and Yasmin cases in state courts in California, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

"Under the agreement, Bayer will pay $2,000 to plaintiffs who suffered gallbladder injuries and $3,000 to individuals who had their gallbladders removed, according to the agreement," Reuters reported.

The Canadian Broadcasting Company reported in a June 12, 2013 posting***** that "According to documents obtained from Health Canada, doctors and pharmacists say Yaz and Yasmin are suspected in the deaths of the women, who mostly died suddenly from blood clots."

Health Canada is the Canadian equivalent to the FDA, which, on April 10, 2012, issued a Health Warning informing consumers and physicians about possible Yaz and Yasmin blood clotting side effects.******

"The Health Canada report comes shortly after a Canadian judge certified******* a class-action lawsuit filed on behalf of women who are making allegations that Yaz and Yasmin can cause life-threatening blood clots," said Resource4thePeople.

The CBC also reported that "According to the documents obtained from Health Canada, between 2007 and February 2013, doctors and pharmacists have reported 600 adverse reactions and 23 deaths where Yaz or Yasmin were suspected. More than half of the reported deaths were women under 26, with the youngest age 14."

The April 10, 2012 Food and Drug Administration warning about Yaz and Yasmin blood-clotting side effects mirrored these allegations:

“The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has completed its review of recent observational (epidemiologic) studies regarding the risk of blood clots in women taking drospirenone-containing birth control pills. Drospirenone is a synthetic version of the female hormone, progesterone, also referred to as a progestin. Based on this review, FDA has concluded that drospirenone-containing birth control pills may be associated with a higher risk for blood clots than other progestin-containing pills.”

Sources:
*In re: Yasmin and Yaz (Drospirenone) Marketing, Sales Practices and Products Liability Litigation MDL No. 2100, U.S. District Court, Southern District of Illinois
** http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2013-09-15/health/ct-met-birth-control-risks-20130915_1_drospirenone-clots-pills
***http://www.annualreport2012.bayer.com/en/legal-risks.aspx
****http://newsandinsight.thomsonreuters.com/Legal/News/2013/03_-_March/Bayer_agrees_to_settle_Yasmin,_Yaz_gallbladder_law
*****http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2013/06/11/birth-control-pills-yaz-yasmin.html
******http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm299305.htm
*******Case # 52030110, Ontario Superior Court of Justice, St. Catherine's, Ontario, Canada

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