English Woodlands Release New Advice Series on Effective Home Orchard Planning

Share Article

With the ‘grow-your-own’ movement continuing to expand, English Woodlands are releasing a new advice series geared towards introducing beginner gardeners to planning a home orchard.

Tree Suppliers | English Woodlands
English Woodlands discuss the importance of locating an optimal planting site with sun exposure and wind protection, including the potential use for deciduous shrubs and trees as an organic windbreak.

Over the past decade the British public has made one fact abundantly clear, they love growing their own produce. An article by the Daily Telegraph, ‘Top Gardening Trends for 2013’, discusses the current obsession in more detail, and the rise in popularity of home-grown foods over the last few years, particularly the shift from an intuitive drive towards household austerity in the face of recession to a more a fashionable, leisurely-yet-challenging pursuit for gardeners of all types.

English Woodlands, a tree supplier operating out of their expansive nursery in Heathfield, East Sussex, have witnessed this trend, with interest in cropping trees continuing to grow. It’s for this reason that during September the company are releasing a detailed advice series on efficient and effective planning of a home orchard, primarily targeted towards consumers and homeowners seeking to start off their ‘grow-your-own’ journey on the right foot.

The new blog, intended to be expanded over time, provides a handy overview on a number of topics, each of which is an essential factor in ensuring good health and an impressive annual yield. Readers can learn about the importance of tree choice, varieties such as the apple can provide enough for a family of four from a single plant, or recommendations for a whole orchard can be supplied.

English Woodlands discuss the importance of locating an optimal planting site with sun exposure and wind protection, including the potential use for deciduous shrubs and trees as an organic windbreak.

Interested parties can enjoy a brief de-mystification of pollination, with an introduction to self-fertile species, inter-pollinating species and wind pollinated species, and the differing treatment each will require in an efficiently laid out garden. Inter-pollinators should be placed no more than 18 metres apart for optimal pollination by bees, for instance, and self-fertile plants which pollinate via wind, such as the hazel family, should be planted in groups of more than one to increase chances of a good harvest.

They go on to explain the importance of fruit trees being grafted to particular rootstocks, and how to select an appropriate rootstock for individual gardens depending on the space needed and vigour demanded. The company goes on to elaborate on ideal planting distances to facilitate maintenance within a group of trees, and ensure a satisfactory crop.

The post is the latest in a long series of advice and editorials from English Woodlands, seeking to keep their customers better informed, and ensure they’re able to make the most of their investments with the company. Release of the advice series on orchard planning coincides with the company’s current focus on fruiting trees, with a 20% discount on unusual fruit trees effective until October 31st. Interested parties can visit http://www.ewburrownursery.co.uk/ for more information, or contact the tree supplier at sales(at)ewburrownursery(dot)co(dot)uk, or call direct on 01435 862 992 where an experienced team member will be more than happy to help handle enquiries.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Matthew Banes
Visit website