Polaris Marketing Research: Stress Levels and What To Do About It Is Different for Men and Women

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Polaris Marketing Research Inc. announced today further findings from their latest survey of online Americans, supported by Research Now for data collection and analysis. This survey is the second wave of a study originally done in 2012 to evaluate levels and sources of stress among adults, and different ways of dealing with their stress.

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While overall stress levels among online American adults did not change between 2012 and 2013, men continue to endure higher levels of stress than females.

In February 2013, 1200 online American adults were asked to rate themselves on a stress scale, where 10 is “very stressed” and 1 is “not at all stressed”. Currently, seventeen percent of online American adults say that their stress level is 1, 2 or 3, or quite low (Bottom 3). On the other hand, thirty-four percent indicated their stress level is 10, 9, or 8, or quite high (Top 3). That compares to 2012, where nineteen percent of respondents rated themselves in the Bottom 3 and thirty-two percent rated themselves in the Top 3. While overall stress levels among online American adults did not change between 2012 and 2013, men continue to endure higher levels of stress than females.

In 2013, thirty-nine percent of men reported their stress level in the Top Three, while in 2012, a comparable thirty-six percent of men reported stress levels in the Top Three. Among females, on the other hand, thirty percent reported 2013 stress levels in the Top Three and in 2012, twenty-eight percent reported stress levels in the Top Three.

Additionally, even though stress levels overall are unchanged, perception of stress seems to be improving, as seventy-three percent said their stress levels were “about the same as” or “less than” 2012 (significantly more than the comparable 2012 measurement of sixty-seven percent). From the gender perspective, only twenty-five percent of males said they were “more stressed than a year ago” (compared to the significantly higher thirty-two percent in 2012). Thirty percent of females in 2013 said they were “more stressed than a year ago” (significantly higher than males in 2013, but not different from females in 2012).

Sources of stress also differ by gender. More men than women said they had “no main sources of stress” in 2013 (seventeen percent for men vs. eight percent for women). Women on the other hand were significantly more likely than men to name the following stress sources: financial issues (fifty-four percent of women vs. forty-six percent of men), not enough time (thirty-seven percent of women vs. twenty-six percent of men), family problems (twenty-one percent of women vs. fourteen percent of men, living situation twenty percent of women vs. sixteen percent of men), and balancing work and family (twenty percent of women vs. fourteen percent of men).

Read our blog for more details regarding this study.

About Polaris Marketing Research

Founded by Jan Carlson, Polaris Marketing Research is a full-service firm that provides state-of-the-art online interactive marketing research reporting, interviewing and data collection, quantitative and qualitative research expertise and personalized project management.
Atlanta-based Polaris Marketing Research is affiliated with the Council of American Survey Research Organizations, the American Marketing Association and the American Society for Quality.

About Research Now

Research Now, the leading digital data collection provider, powers market research insights. We enable companies to listen to and interact with the world’s consumers and business professionals through online panels, as well as mobile, digital and social media technologies. Our team operates in 24 offices globally and is recognized as the market research industry’s leader in client satisfaction. We foster a socially responsible culture by empowering our employees to give back. To find out more or begin a conversation with us, visit http://www.researchnow.com.

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Danica Kwon
danica.kwon@polarismr.com
(678)323-3276
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