Florida Pond Management Announces New Program; Control Mosquitoes the Natural Way

Keeping outside summer ponds clear of mosquito larva, clear and active does not take harmful chemicals. A firm like Florida Pond Management can help you convert a stagnant body of standing water into a show piece with fountains and fish, without insect larva and odorless in a few easy steps.

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natural mosquito control for summer ponds

Paradise Fish

Some of the oldest varieties of aquarium fish are called tropical fish but come from more temperate climates, and survive very nicely in unheated aquariums.

Orlando, Florida (PRWEB) April 01, 2014

After years of research Florida Pond Management announces a new program designed to control mosquitoes in backyard ponds without chemicals.

Thomas R. Reich PhD explained “Aquarium fish do not always have to be kept in heated tanks under totally controlled environments. Many native fish of temperate and sub-tropical climates are species of tropical fish, which can be kept and will thrive and breed in outdoor ponds if certain conditions are met. “

1)    The average temperature is consistently over 60 F and average air temp is over 70 F in the day time.
2)    The pond is at least partially submerged in the earth, which “normalizes” the average temperature within the body of water.
3)    The pond has sufficient plants so the fish can seek shade from the intense summer sun.
4)    The water level is kept up with either rain water or aged water, not directly from a garden hose
5)    Grass clippings are not allowed to fall into the pond, since this risks cross contamination by pest control substances or fertilizers that could poison the fish and plants in the pond.
6)    Until the fish are established in nature, feed them once a day with general fish food, similar to what you would feed them in an aquarium.
7)    Relax its easier than it sounds.

“As long as tropical fish are put outside in ponds and fountains of sufficient depth after all fears of frost are over and brought back inside early in autumn before temperatures drop below 60 F many species can thrive in the summer ponds of temperate and subtropical climates,” Reich continued.

“Some of the oldest varieties of aquarium fish are called tropical fish but come from more temperate climates, and survive very nicely in unheated aquariums. The Paradise Fish (Macropodus opercularis) and the White Cloud Mountain Minnow (Tanichthys albonubes) are good examples of heartier species of tropical fish that do not need the warmth that an Angle Fish needs, for example,” explained Dark Water Aquatics of Orlando Florida.

Goldfish and Koi have long been good pond fish, since they can even handle the icing over of water as long as liquid remains below the surface. But Goldfish and Koi are not effective in controlling mosquitoes, and tend to be a dirty fish requiring much more maintenance and filtration than smaller aquarium fish.

“One thing you must look out for are predators, larger fish like Goldfish and Koi may be attacked by cats, raccoons or even passing birds of prey. The smaller aquarium fish like guppies, platys, swordtails and mollies are so prolific however, that their constant flows of fri will outpace just about any predator, another great reason to try these mosquito eating marvels,” explained Dr. Reich.

Keeping outside summer ponds clear of mosquito larva, clear and active does not take harmful chemicals. Tait Carson Founder of Florida Pond Management added “A firm like Florida Pond Management can help you convert a stagnant body of standing water into a show piece with fountains and fish, clear of insect larva and without odor in a few easy steps. Try it the natural way, fish, live plants and aerated water is now nature intended healthy bodies of water to maintain their clear beauty.”

Tait Carson and Florida Pond Management can be contacted: 407.472.9258

Thomas R. Reich PhD can be contacted:    407.574.3550

Dark Water Aquatics can be contacted: 561.318.1195


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Dr. Thomas R. Reich explains how to rid mosquitos without pestisides Mosquito fish eating mosquito larva.

Mosquito fish eating mosquito larva.