Seasoned Skiers and Snowboarders Have a Best Kept Secret: Now is the Time to Hit the Slopes, Says Frank N. Darras, of DarrasLaw

Experienced winter sports athletes are on the slopes now. Consider the risks of skiing and snowboarding, and how disability insurance coverage can protect your income should an injury occur.

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America's Insurance Lawyer to the Pros

The major issue here is the risk for a disabling injury, which in these two sports tend to involve the head, torn ACLs, and major broken bones.

Ontario, CA (PRWEB) April 08, 2014

Whether skiing or snowboarding, there are many different opinions out there as to which of these winter sports is more dangerous. The truth is, there are injuries in both sports, especially head injuries, which can be life threatening.

Some businesses have taken a strong stance by not even allowing one of these winter sports. The Alta ski area in Utah is now one of three major ski areas that do not allow snowboarders. Their concern is the way snowboarders come down the slopes and make wide, sweeping turns.

According to seasoned skiers and a report at NBC News, skiers know the best time of year to hit the slopes isn't in the dead of winter, but rather when most Americans are turning their attention toward baseball and spring break beaches. There are more than a few resorts where spring skiing means good powder, sunny skies, no lines and reduced prices. Places such as Aspen, Colorado and Alta, Utah, and depending on the snow depth, can stay open for spring skiing sometimes as late as Memorial Day. (NBCnews.com, Sometimes the best skiing starts when winter ends, February 1, 2011)

“Like any sport, snowboarding and free style skiing come with risks and to the extent that is possible, athletes do their best to mitigate them. But with elite athletes suffering multiple concussions at a young age, more questions than answers remain about the culture perhaps nonchalant in its attitude towards concussions and the effects on their long-term health,” (Head injuries a rising danger for snowboarders, skiers: USA Today, February 26, 2013).

“The major issue here is the risk for a disabling injury, which in these two sports tend to involve the head, torn ACLs, and major broken bones,” says Frank N. Darras, America’s top disability insurance lawyer. “As with a lot of top athletes in most sports, skiers and snowboarders will push themselves to obtain the top spot in competitions, despite the amount of concussions or other significant injuries they have suffered. If they’re going to keep participating in the sport they love, they need to protect themselves and their income with an individual disability insurance policy.”

An own-occupation individual disability insurance policy should be a "must have" for athletes because they risk injury every time they participate in their sport. What happens if a professional snowboarder breaks an ankle and is out of the half pipe competitions for a full season? Disability insurance will provide reliable monthly benefits to help cover rent, utilities, and other daily living expenses like groceries. When someone loves a sport enough to keep competing, even though the threat of injury is high, it’s time to protect his or her livelihood with individual disability insurance.

“I admire the strong sense of character it takes to keep doing what you love, no matter the risks to yourself. These professional athletes may be risking a more serious injury down the road but they aren’t letting that thought hold them back. They should talk with an insurance expert or a top experienced disability insurance lawyer to learn what type of policy they might need and how it will work for them. Take advantage of the opportunity now before your risk grows even higher,” says Darras.

About DarrasLaw

Frank N. Darras, founding partner of DarrasLaw is the nation's most recognized authority on insurance law. Contact us today for free policy advice and free claim evaluation.

Interview requests, please contact Robin Nolan. 919-745-9333.

Sources:

USA Today, Head injuries a rising danger for snowboarders, skiers, February 26, 2013