A Physical Therapist at Hands-On Physical Therapy of NY Presents Information Related to Injury Sustained by American World Cup Forward Jozy Altidore

Physical Therapist Explains the Hamstring Injury that Sidelined United States Striker Jozy Altidore

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Vinit Kothekar, PT, MS points out that while hamstring injuries are the most common injury in sports, Altidore has an additional challenge having had a prior hamstring strain.

Astoria, NY (PRWEB) June 28, 2014

When 24-year-old Striker Jozy Altidore fell to the ground in the Americans’ World Cup opener against Ghana, he was felled by the most common injury in all of sports.

Contact sports such as football, rugby, cricket, basketball, and soccer all see their share of hamstring injuries as do non-contact sports such as marathon running, tennis and even bowling. All athletic activities that involve sprinting, jumping and kicking or that require rapid acceleration and deceleration and changes in direction are liable to produce a hamstring injury.

The hamstrings are a group of three muscles that run along the back of the thigh from the pelvis to the lower leg. Working together, these three muscles help the athlete bend their knee and with some of the hip movement necessary to running and jumping.

Even with proper warm-ups and stretching, the hamstring muscles are at times ill-prepared to deal with the use and strain demanded of them in professional sports.

Vinit Kothekar, PT, MS points out that while hamstring injuries are the most common injury in sports, Altidore has an additional challenge having had a prior hamstring strain. Jozy Altidore suffered a hamstring injury in the 2011 CONCACAF Gold Cup quarterfinals and missed the semifinal and final match. A player with a previous hamstring injury is at high risk of suffering another, even years after the first injury.

Vinit Kothekar, physical therapist at Hands-On Physical Therapy in New York, says the reason these injuries are so likely to recur is unclear, but may be due, in part, to the formation of scar tissue during the healing process. However, experts do agree rushing an athlete back onto the field without proper rehabilitation significantly increase the risk of re-injury, now or at a later time.

Hands-On Physical Therapy has four offices in New York City: Astoria (Queens); Bay Ridge (Brooklyn) and two in Manhattan. To learn more about Hands-On Physical Therapy of New York, please visit http://HandsonPT.org or call (888) 626-2699.


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