From Wallowing to Feeling Better: Tina Gilbertson Shows How Experiencing Bad Emotions Can Make People Happier

Constructive Wallowing, by Viva Editions author Tina Gilbertson, was recently featured about using wallowing to feel better.

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Constructive Wallowing by Tina Gilbertson

A close cousin to wallowing, which we frequently think of in negative terms but which can make us feel better too, is complaining.

(PRWEB) July 11, 2014

Allen Klein, prolific Viva Editions author and the world's only Jollytologist recently featured Tina Gilbertson and her new book Constructive Wallowing: How to Beat Bad Feelings by Letting Yourself Have Them on Examiner. He discusses how wallowing can lead to feeling better faster, as Gilbertson writes in her book.

Klein writes, "A close cousin to wallowing, which we frequently think of in negative terms but which can make us feel better too, is complaining. Researchers are finding that “effective complaining”, like constructive wallowing, could have some mental health benefits. For instance, you may feel satisfied when you complain to a customer service agent and, because of your complaint, get the issue resolved."

See Tina Gilbertson in person at these events:
7/15: East West Bookshop, Mountain View, CA - 7:30pm
7/16: Towne Center Books, Pleasanton, CA - 11am
7/16: Readers Books, Sonoma, CA - 7pm
7/17: A Great Good Place for Books, Oakland, CA - 7pm
7/19: Book Passage, Marin, CA - 4pm
7/20: Laurel Book Store, Oakland, CA - 4pm
7/21: Barnes and Noble, San Jose, CA - 11am

Constructive Wallowing: How to Beat Bad Feelings by Letting Yourself Have Them
By Tina Gilbertson

Actress-turned-therapist Tina Gilbertson offers a practical and effective alternative to kicking yourself when you’re down. Constructive Wallowing will not only help readers reach their potential but also heal from past hurts and feel better about themselves, right this minute. It is tempting to turn away from menacing, uncomfortable feelings like anger, grief or regret and treat them like unwanted guests. However, ignoring them just seems to make them stick around. By learning to accept, rather than suppress, difficult feelings, readers will gain greater self-understanding for lifelong emotional health.