Stoller Soybean Research Trial Produces 214 Bushels Per Acre

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Soybean research trials conducted by members of the Stoller Enterprises research and product development team have produced a 214.7 bushel-per-acre yield in the Rio Grande Valley, near Weslaco, Texas. The two hundred plus bushel-per-acre yield may be highest yield achieved in replicated soybean plot trials.

Soybean research trials conducted by members of the Stoller Enterprises research and product development team have produced a 214.7 bushel-per-acre yield in the Rio Grande Valley, near Weslaco, Texas. The two hundred plus bushel-per-acre yield may be highest yield achieved in replicated soybean plot trials.

The research focused on the yield response to application of supplemental nitrogen during the growing season and was conducted by Stoller Enterprises under contract with Plant Power Products, Inc., an entity with which Stoller Enterprises does research and product development. The research utilized replicated plots and was conducted in the same manner as research done by major agricultural universities and companies.

The 214.7 bushel-per-acre yield was achieved from soybean seed planted at a population of 105,000 plants per acre. An initial broadcast application of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium was applied prior to planting with additional fertilizer applications made throughout the growing season using a drip irrigation system. The cumulative amount of fertilizer applied during the growing season totaled 610 pounds of nitrogen, 40 pounds of phosphorus and 200 pounds of potassium.

“The agronomic community has long believed soybeans need four to six pounds of nitrogen to produce a bushel of grain and the nodules on the soybean roots would become lazy if excess nitrogen was present,” says Jerry Stoller, president of Stoller Enterprises, Inc. “Our research trials clearly show that supplemental nitrogen can provide a significant yield increase and nodules don’t become lazy throughout the entire growing season.

“In order to achieve this high yield, our Plant Power Products were applied to help maintain energy to the nodules throughout the entire growing season,” adds Stoller. “The root nodules never dried up or lost their ability to fix more nitrogen.”

The Stoller research trials also showed that as plant populations increased, yields decreased slightly. Stoller says he plans to continue research to find what is causing the drop in yield. “The highest yield was obtained from the lowest plant density ─ not the highest density. Stoller Enterprises is committed to understanding how to help the plant utilize more nitrogen, the relationship between yield and plant density as well developing the products that make it possible for farmers to maximize the genetic potential in the seed they plant.”

All the soybean research trials were conducted using a vernal soybean variety seeded at populations ranging from 105,000 to 278,000 seeds per acre. There were replicated studies of each population rate and all the trials were analyzed for significant differences. Yield differences were also expressed in the diameter of the stalk, extensiveness of root systems and the number of pods per raceme on the soybean plants.

The research was conducted under the direction of Dr. Albert Liptay, director of research for Stoller Enterprises, Inc. at the Texas A&M AgriLIFE Research center in Weslaco, Texas.

For questions concerning information in this news release, contact Jstoller(at)stollerusa(dot)com.

About Stoller Enterprises, Inc.
Headquartered in Houston, Texas, Stoller Enterprises, Inc. is dedicated to helping producers enhance yields by maximizing genetic expression. Only Stoller products contain Stoller’s proprietary technology that is proven to ensure optimum plant growth by maintaining appropriate hormone balance and activity. In combination with proper nutrition and good farming practices, the result is enhanced marketable yield, significant return-on-investment and improved stress tolerance. Validated by universities nationwide, Stoller’s unique formulations outperform traditional products and result in healthier, more productive crops that are better able to achieve their full genetic potential.

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Evan Stadlman

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