Ten young Ontarians representing seven Alzheimer Societies in Ontario to talk “dementia” at an Ottawa gathering.

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“While age remains dementia’s biggest risk factor, age can also represent our biggest hope” says Gale Carey, CEO, Alzheimer Society of Ontario.

Involving young people in dementia talks will make a difference in the attention that dementia and caregiving get at various policy and funding levels. They are our leaders of tomorrow.

While the toll of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia on the aging population is well documented, the disease impacts people of every age. On Wednesday September 10, young Canadians touched by the disease will gather at the British High Commission in Ottawa to discuss and find creative ways of meeting the dementia challenge. Ten young people representing a total of seven Alzheimer Societies in Ontario will be part of this important event held in parallel to the Global Action Against Dementia Legacy Events in Canada, Japan and the US, and a separate event in Paris.

At the invitation of the UK Science and Innovation Network in Canada, 10 young Ontarians join a delegation of 27 Canadians from across the country, to discuss, brainstorm, invent and challenge the way society can “help people with dementia live independently for longer and what can we do to help find a cure?” The aim is to create a network of young leaders who can make important contributions to the work of the UK-initiated World Dementia Council. The 10 young Ontarians represent the Alzheimer Societies of :

  •     London and Middlesex
  •     Ottawa and Renfrew County
  •     Perth County
  •     Sudbury-Manitoulin and North Bay Districts
  •     Thunder Bay
  •     Toronto
  •     Waterloo-Wellington.

“Involving young people in dementia talks will make a difference in the attention that dementia and caregiving get at various policy and funding levels” says Gale Carey, Chief Executive Officer at the Alzheimer Society of Ontario. “They are our leaders of tomorrow.”

Because fresh thinking can lead to creative and effective new strategies, a declaration of Innovative Ideas to address dementia could be presented, as a youth perspective, at the WHO Geneva event planned for March 2015.

“A dementia diagnosis will impact the whole family,” reminds Gale Carey. “We can’t forget that young people will also face personal challenges during the dementia journey by living their own grief and struggling to support their parent’s well-being, for example. Their perspectives and insights will help identify better ways to meet current needs, and highlight new opportunities.”

“While age remains dementia’s biggest risk factor, age can also represent our biggest hope” she concludes.

To better understand the impact of dementia in Ontario, click to this 2014 Dementia by the number video.

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About the Alzheimer Society of Ontario
The Alzheimer Society of Ontario and its network of local Societies across the province offer Help for Today through programs and services for people living with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias and Hope for Tomorrow…by funding research to find the cause and the cure. http://www.alzheimerontario.ca

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Pascale Guillotte
Alzheimer Society of Ontario
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