Back-to-School Guide Provides Success Strategies For Parents Of Autistic Children At No Cost

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Your Autism Coach, LLC has published a complimentary, back-to-school guide for parents of autistic and special needs children. It provides proven techniques to help parents successfully manage the school year, with less stress, more enjoyment and better results for everyone; it can be downloaded at http://www.yourautismcoach.com.

During the back-to-school season, parents of autistic and special needs children are often overwhelmed with the challenges of educating their child. Many feel that navigating the special education system and advocating for their child is a full time job in itself. The responsibilities and tasks can seem endless, especially as they try to balance work and family lives.

Your Autism Coach, LLC, a New York-based parent coaching and seminar company, has published Having A Great School Year With Your Autistic Child (http://www.yourautismcoach.com/back-to-school-tips). This complimentary booklet provides proven techniques designed to help parents, not only survive and manage the school year, but look forward to a successful academic year with less stress, more enjoyment and better results for everyone. A copy of the guide is available at no cost, by downloading it, at http://www.yourautismcoach.com. Parents can also call (347) 869-4705 or send an e-mail to info(at)yourautismcoach(dot)com to request a copy.

According to Deanna Picon, Founder of Your Autism Coach, LLC and author of The Autism Parents' Guide To Reclaiming Your Life (http://www.amazon.com/dp/1497581222) parents should consider applying these tips to have a successful school year:

  •     Get involved. One of the smartest and most effective things you can do for your child’s education is to simply get involved. Get to know your child’s teacher, classroom paraprofessionals and therapists. After all, they may actually spend more time with your child than you do. Your child’s teaching team can help you understand how autism affects your child in the classroom, and offer advice on appropriate academic activities and lesson plans. And therapists may help you develop some easy and practical activities that you can do at home that will help reinforce their work.
  •     Form a winning partnership. Your child’s educators and therapists will be more helpful and involved when you come forward as an engaged partner. Tell and show them you want to work with them. Be open, honest and approachable with them and they will be the same in return. Discuss best practices for communicating and building a successful partnership.
  •     Be the head cheerleader. Every child has the potential to be a unique, wonderful person. But that doesn’t happen without the ongoing support and encouragement of parental figures. To get the most out of life, including their educations, children need a team of cheerleaders to urge them to do their best, make them feel proud of their achievements, and help them get over their mistakes or failures. You should be the captain of that cheerleading squad. Instead of concentrating on what may or may not be possible in the future, you will help yourself and your child more by celebrating every little achievement of today. Focus on the “here and now” and give your child plenty of TLC (tender, loving care).
  •     Have fun with your child. Like any child, yours deserves to be a kid – to have some fun, enjoy the experiences of life and just relax sometimes. And you know what? You deserve that too. You don’t have to spend every waking moment, analyzing your child’s behavior or trying to modify it. They get enough of it in school with constant observation and therapy. So have some fun. Do some arts and crafts or finger painting. Blow bubbles and pop them. Take a day trip to the zoo, museum or aquarium or go see a movie. Remember, every experience can create new learning opportunities.

Your Autism Coach, LLC is committed to providing superior coaching services and seminars that address the issues and concerns of parents of autistic and special needs children.

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Deanna Picon