Montana Man Finds Relief from Cardiac Blockage and a New Lease on Life 2,327 Miles Away — at The Heart Institute at Staten Island University Hospital

Share Article

Hamilton, Montana man heads East to take advantage of pioneering cardiac bypass surgery developed by renowned cardiothoracic surgeon Joseph T. McGinn, Jr., MD: Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery/Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting, or MICS CABG.

News Image

Hamilton, Montana patient Daniel Nelson (c) with Roger Cepeda, PA (l), and Pioneering Carthoracic Surgeon Dr. Joseph T. McGinn (r) at The heart Institute on Staten Island, 3 days after bypass surgery.

Coming to the pioneer was a smart move,” Mr. Nelson affirmed. “I wanted to go to the top of the food chain. They’ve got the best of what I was looking for, and that’s exactly what I got.

The Heart Institute (THI) at Staten Island University Hospital has attracted and treated thousands of patients from New York City, around the country and all over the world over the years. So it’s not surprising that when Daniel Nelson, a professional farrier, or horseshoer, needed a minimally invasive procedure to cure a severe blockage in a stent, he travelled over 2,300 miles from his home near Missoula in southwestern Montana to have it done by the team that pioneered the procedure.

The procedure, which was performed on October 3rd, is called Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery/Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting, or MICS CABG, was developed in 2005 by Joseph T. McGinn, Jr., MD, THI’s leading cardiothoracic surgeon. Known as "The McGinn Technique," this groundbreaking procedure uses three small incisions and allows the cardiothoracic team to alleviate cardiac distress without having to break ribs and open the chest. This results in significantly less pain, minimized risk, improved outcomes, vastly reduced scarring, and a much-shorter post-operative recovery period. To date, Dr. McGinn has trained over 300 surgeons worldwide.

“Back in 1999 I had a stent put in, and about a year or so ago I was working out on my elliptical but I couldn’t get my cardio up,” Mr. Nelson recalls. “It kept getting worse and worse.” He checked in with his cardiologist, who performed an angiogram. “They found that I had a stent that was 90% plugged. So I decided I needed to do something about it.”

Mr. Nelson’s doctors in Hamilton told him they wanted to perform open heart surgery. There were no facilities anywhere near him home that performed minimally invasive cardiothoracic procedures. “So I checked around different places.” He logged on to the Internet to do some research, and he quickly discovered The Heart Institute’s Web site, and the McGinn Technique. He was convinced that coming East was the most logical decision.

“I decided that since this was the place where it all began, I might as well come to where it started,” Mr. Nelson says. He underwent the MICS/CABG procedure the morning of October 3rd and went home to Montana in just three days. His post-operative recovery went flawlessly, and Mr. Nelson resumed work with horses within a week, and is enjoying a second lease on life — thanks to Dr. McGinn and his team at THI.

“Coming to the pioneer was a smart move,” Mr. Nelson affirmed. “I wanted to go to the top of the food chain. They’ve got the best of what I was looking for, and that’s exactly what I got.”

According to Dr. McGinn, who performed the MICS/CABG procedure on Mr. Nelson, the severity of his coronary blockage made him an ideal candidate for MICS/CABG. “Traditionally in a case presented like Mr. Nelson’s, cardiothoracic surgeons would have had to resort to opening the chest (sternotomy or a vertical line incision made to the sternum - cracking of the rib cage) to eradicate the blockage,” Dr. McGinn said. “With our minimally invasive procedure, Mr. Nelson was in the operating suite for just under two hours, and was sitting up later that day. I’m pleased that we were able to perform MICS/CABG and that he is back with his family and enjoying a healthful life once again.

For more information on Mr. Nelson and on Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery/Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting, or MICS CABG, at The Heart Institute at Staten Island University Hospital, contact: Richard A. Clarke at cell: 917.868.1407, or via email at: RClarke(at)theHeartInstituteNY(dot)com. Or contact John P. Demoleas at 718.226.6462, or via email at: jdemoleas(at)siuh(dot)edu. Visit The Heart Institute’s Web site at: http://www.theheartinstituteny.com/

The Heart Institute opened in 2001 and operates at the North Campus of Staten Island University Hospital at 475 Seaview Avenue. It is one of the nation’s leading heart hospitals, known for its pioneering techniques in minimally invasive heart surgery, including The McGinn Technique (MICS CABG), taught at The Heart Institute since 1995. Today, The Heart Institute performs the most advanced treatments in minimally invasive cardiac surgery and electrophysiology (A-fib), procedures such as Hybrid A-fib Ablation, in addition to the most advanced diagnostic technologies, post-surgical outpatient care, and cardiac prevention programs. The Heart Institute at Staten Island University Hospital is part of the North Shore – LIJ Health System.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Richard A. Clarke

John P. Demoleas
@bypasstheordnry
since: 04/2012
Follow >
The Heart Institute
since: 11/2010
Like >
Visit website