Healthy School Lunches Are Not The Only Solution To Increase Student Learning Potential And Well Being

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Significant Lighting warns healthy school lunches are the tip of the iceberg. More than good food and test scores should be used to measure high performance schools.

Many educators and even more parents don’t realize the importance appropriate lighting plays in a child’s ability to learn.

Healthy school lunches are the tip of the iceberg for concerned school districts and communities looking to provide ideal conditions for effective student learning. Lighting design expert Greg Day, Principal of Greg Day Lighting (http://gregdaylighting.com) and collaborator at Significant Lighting, a new lighting design firm focused on linking education and lighting (http://significantlighting.com) sees a long-term approach to helping students stay healthy.

“Many educators and even more parents don’t realize the importance appropriate lighting plays in a child’s ability to learn,” says Day. Many studies have concluded that poor or inappropriate lighting in schools not only affects learning, but has an adverse affect on health as well. According to Day, local school districts should set minimum standards for incorporating daylight into their facilities. He suggests three strategies to get on the right track:

  • If new construction is in the works, a floor plan with an east-west axis and south facing windows to harvest daylight is appropriate.
  • Use of intelligent control systems that can monitor and supplement daylight will help student health and energy conservation.
  • Incorporate skylights, or skylight substitutes, in high traffic areas and stairwells to maximize use of daylight exposure for a majority of students.

More than good food and test scores should be used to measure high performance schools.

“A healthy and productive student learning environment is difficult to maintain without appropriate lighting design,” says Day. “Schools with great lighting have healthier students who attend school more days per year. Ultimately, providing the best learning environment we can is a gateway to success.”

About Greg Day

Greg Day has been practicing Architectural Lighting Design throughout the Northeast United States, and Europe since 1986. He holds degrees in Architecture and Architectural Engineering from the University of Kansas. Throughout his lighting career Greg has been especially interested in how various lighting affects people's moods and their ability to learn and be productive. Learn more about his firm's services at Greg Day Lighting http://gregdaylighting.com and his academic lighting design efforts at Significant Lighting http://significantlighting.com.

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Kalynn Amadio
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