Girl Scouts of Historic Georgia to Host Domestic Violence Prevention Program

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CEO named to commission to advise NFLPA

“I am so happy to be part of an organization that can make a difference in the rates of domestic violence by addressing it early,” says the council’s CEO, Sue Else.

Girl Scouts of Historic Georgia is battling the issue of domestic violence. With a CEO who spent more than 25 years working as a domestic violence prevention professional, and a powerful, age-appropriate program called “I am a G.I.F.T. You Will Not Mistreat Me”, the organization has a multi-layered strategy focused on making a difference.

The statistics are frightening. National data indicate that one out of every four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime. One in five teens who have been involved in a serious dating relationship reports being slapped, hit or pushed by their partner. Exposure to family violence or teen dating violence has been linked to increased depression, anxiety, anger, substance abuse, poor academic achievement, and even suicide. Girl Scouts of Historic Georgia thinks they have a role to play in changing this picture.

The organization will present “I Am a G.I.F.T. (Gorgeous, Intelligent, Fantastic and Talented), You Will Not Mistreat Me” from 9am-3pm on December 6, 2014 at the Coastal Georgia Center in Savannah. Girls in 7th – 12th grades are invited to discover their uniqueness and value, and to learn how to recognize and build healthy friendships, family and dating relationships. The program is supported by funding from United Way of the Coastal Empire. The cost is $3 per girl, which covers program materials, lunch and a t-shirt; adults may attend for $10. Those interested in attending may contact the program registrar at programregistrar(at)gshg(dot)org.

“I am so happy to be part of an organization that can make a difference in the rates of domestic violence by addressing it early,” says the council’s CEO, Sue Else. “When we pursue our mission to build girls of courage, confidence and character, we are helping girls develop the very attributes that will help them safeguard themselves from domestic violence. Girl Scouts is doing powerful work to bring the girl voice to the prevention side of this issue.”

Prior to joining Girl Scouts, Else was President and CEO of the National Network to End Domestic Violence, Inc. In her new role, she is still investing in prevention work by investing in the lives of girls. Else’s experience and passion for the issue has earned her a position on the newly formed, national commission of experts that will advise the NFL Players Association about domestic violence.

About Girl Scouts:
Founded in Savannah, Georgia in 1912, Girl Scouts of the USA is the preeminent leadership development organization for girls with 3.2 million girl and adult members worldwide. Girl Scouts is the leading authority on girls' healthy development, and builds girls of courage, confidence and character, who make the world a better place.

Girl Scouts of Historic Georgia serves 18,000 members throughout Georgia, including areas surrounding Albany, Athens, Augusta, Columbus, Gainesville, Macon, Savannah, Statesboro, Tifton and Valdosta. For more information on how to join, volunteer, reconnect or donate to Girl Scouts, visit http://www.gshg.org.

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Debbie Caballero

Tara Nobles
Girl Scouts of Historic Georgia
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