Chicago Car Accident Attorneys Remind Illinois Drivers of New 2015 Laws

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The law firm of Salvi, Schostok & Pritchard P.C. wants to remind drivers of several new laws including an increase to the minimum mandatory coverage amount for auto liability insurance and an increase to the speed limit on the state's toll highways.

Patrick A. Salvi

While we believe the minimum auto liability insurance amounts are still low for someone who is seriously hurt, this law will provide some financial help for those injured.

The Chicago Car Accident Attorneys of Salvi, Schostok & Pritchard P.C. want to remind drivers of new Illinois laws that will impact motorists as of January 1, 2015.

Starting in the New Year, the minimum mandatory coverage amount for auto liability insurance will increase for the first time in over 25 years. This means some drivers will have to carry a higher amount of auto liability insurance as required by Illinois law. If a driver is involved in a car accident and injures someone, this insurance helps pay for the medical bills of the injured parties.

Under Senate Bill 1898, seriously injured people involved in a car accident, will be able to recover a little bit more money for their medical bills. The amounts will increase: for bodily injury or death to any one person from $20,000 to $25,000; bodily injury or death to more than one person from $40,000 to $50,000; and injury to or destruction of property from $15,000 to $20,000.

“Serious car accidents can often leave victims, who’ve been injured through no fault of their own, with a pile of medical bills,” said Patrick A. Salvi, Managing Equity Partner at Salvi, Schostok & Pritchard P.C. “While we believe the minimum auto liability insurance amounts are still low for someone who is seriously hurt, this law will provide some financial help for those injured.”

Also, there are three other new laws Illinois drivers will be happy to hear about. Senate Bill 2015 brings the state’s network of toll highways in the Chicago area up to the same 70 mph speed limit as the rest of the state, unless toll road officials prove that speed is unsafe on those roadways. No longer will drivers need to give up their license for certain traffic offenses. Senate Bill 2583 eliminates the requirement that a valid driver’s license be posted as bail and allows motorists’ signature on a citation to guarantee they will comply with the terms of the citation and either appear in court or pay the required fine. Additionally, Illinois drivers who procrastinate to get their registration sticker will not need to worry about staying off the road. Senate Bill 2802 allows drivers to stay on the road for up to 30 days without a current registration sticker as long as the driver has a receipt proving that they registered the vehicle before the previous registration’s expiration date.

The New Year will also bring some changes to improve the safety of the state’s waterways as well. If someone drinks and operates a boat while intoxicated, under Senate Bill 3434, the operator can have their watercraft seized and forfeited (similar to if someone was operating a motor vehicle) while impaired by alcohol. Senate Bill 3433 requires all persons born after Jan. 1, 1998 to take and pass a boating safety course.

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Lindsey Cramer
Salvi, Schostok & Pritchard P.C.
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