Human and Animal Interaction Identified in the Viking Age

Share Article

Authors of an article in the new issue of the Journal of Parasitology discovered fully intact eggs of human roundworms and whipworms in soil samples from a Viking-aged settlement in Denmark. Using a combination of both morphological and molecular analysis of these soil samples will help to identify historic human parasite infections as well as human and animal interactions.

Excavation of Viking-age workshop at Viborg, Denmark.

This type of knowledge will help researchers understand modern day parasitic infections as well as help historians understand ancient cultural interactions

Journal of Parasitology – Since 2001, ancient DNA has been used in paleoparasitological studies to identify eggs found in soil samples from prehistoric periods, because identification cannot be done by morphological study alone. The species of human parasites living during these periods, provide scientists with a better understanding of how Paleolithic societies might have been organized, with regard to human presence, animal domestication, hunting, and gathering.

In the article “DNA typing of ancient parasite eggs from environmental samples identifies human and animal worm infections in Viking-age settlement,” in the Journal of Parasitology, the authors collected soil samples from a Viking-aged settlement in Denmark dating back to 1018–1030 A.D. These samples contained fully intact eggs of human roundworms and whipworms. This finding shows that humans were present in this settlement, and it is believed that pigs were kept as domesticated animals, with sheep and cattle grazing in nearby pastures.

In this study, it was determined that both morphological and molecular analysis were needed to appropriately determine to which hosts the parasites were linked. Identifying the size and shape of the eggs was not sufficient to determine species, but because the eggs were completely intact, DNA could be extracted and studied for species identification.

Although, as with most studies, false positives may occur, however it is the opinion of these authors that using a combination of both morphological and molecular analysis of soil samples will help to identify historic human parasite infections as well as human and animal interactions. This type of knowledge will help researchers understand modern day parasitic infections as well as help historians understand ancient cultural interactions.

Full text of the article, “DNA typng of ancient parasite eggs from environmental samples identifies human and animal worm infections in Viking-age settlemenit,” Journal of Parasitology, Vol. 100, No. 1, 2014, is now available.

###

About the Journal of Parasitology

The Journal of Parasitology is the official journal of the American Society of Parasitologists (ASP). It is a medium for the publication of new original research, primarily on parasitic animals, and official business of the ASP. The journal is intended for all with interests in basic or applied aspects of general, veterinary, medical parasitology, and epidemiology. For more information, visit http://www.journalofparasitology.org.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Jason Snell
Allen Press, Inc.
+1 8006270326 Ext: 410
Email >
Visit website