Duke University Study Finds Link Between Aspirin And Lower Risk Of Prostate Cancer

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Beverly Hills urologist Dr. Kia Michel comments on a potential link between aspirin consumption and a reduced risk of aggressive prostate cancer.

Kia Michel, MD - Board Certified Urologist

Kia Michel, MD - Board Certified Urologist

Everyone knows that regularly taking aspirin can significantly lower the risk of heart attack in some people. The potential for it to also lower the risk of prostate cancer for some men is very good news.

According to the findings of a recent study out of Duke University, men who regularly take aspirin could significantly lower their risk of developing prostate cancer. Presented at the 13th Annual Conference of the American Association for Cancer Research, the study included 6,390 men who took part in the GlaxoSmithKline-sponsored reduce trial for the effects of the drug dutasteride for enlarged prostate and whether it also reduced the risk of prostate cancer.

Authored by Adriana Vidal, an assistant professor of urology at Duke University, the study was inspired by previous research that showed aspirin and anti-inflammatories to lower levels of PSA (prostate-specific antigen) in some men, which in higher levels could signal an increased risk of prostate cancer.

“The findings of this study are very promising,” said Dr. Kia Michel, a board certified urologist and robotic surgery specialist in Beverly Hills. “Everyone knows that regularly taking aspirin can significantly lower the risk of heart attack in some people. The potential for it to also lower the risk of prostate cancer for some men is very good news.”

The study lasted four years and broke the men into two groups. The first group took aspirin, another NSAID (anti-inflammatory) or a combination of the two. The second group was a control. At the end of the study, the aspirin and NSAID group exhibited a 13 percent lower risk of developing prostate cancer, and a 17 percent lower risk of developing aggressive forms of the disease. The study’s author believes that aspirin can inhibit the production of certain enzymes - specifically COX-1 and COX-2 - which could potentially lead to cell proliferation and the development of prostate cancer down the line.

“It’s still too early to tell the exact impact aspirin will have on reducing the risk of developing prostate cancer and what the ideal dose would be, so patients should consult with their physician to find an appropriate prostate cancer prevention and treatment regime,” added Dr. Michel.

Dr. Michel graduated from Whitman College where he was a Presidential Scholar for four years before attending the University of Washington School of Medicine, where he graduated with Honors and was recognized by the National Medical Honor Society (AOA). Dr. Michel then completed a prestigious six-year residency program in Urologic Surgery at UCLA, where he was recognized as a Pfizer scholar in Urology. After residency, Dr. Michel completed a fellowship in Urological Oncology and advanced surgical techniques also at UCLA. During his fellowship, Dr. Michel’s efforts were recognized by the American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute and the American Foundation for Urologic Disease.

The Prostate Cancer Specialists of Los Angeles Center is an outpatient urological facility located in the heart of Beverly Hills. The physicians at Prostate Cancer Specialists of Los Angeles Center are board-certified urologists with specialty training in a number of different aspects of urology and provide tailored care for their patients with outstanding results. Call them today at (310) 341-2557 or visit their website: http://prostatecancerdr.com/

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