Dr. Khitin Addresses Three Common Myths About Varicose Veins in Lieu of New Study by British Medical Journal

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A recently study published by the British Medical Journal has linked the usage of birth control pills and other oral contraceptives to an increased risk of venous insufficiency. In lieu of this study, Dr. Khitin feels it is necessary to address common misconceptions about vein health, particularly varicose veins, which were also focal point of the BMJ study.

New York Vein Treatment Center

A recently study published by the British Medical Journal has linked the usage of birth control pills and other oral contraceptives to an increased risk of venous insufficiency. In lieu of this study, Dr. Khitin feels it is necessary to address common misconceptions about vein health, particularly varicose veins, which were also focal point of the BMJ study.

Lev M. Khitin, M.D., F.A.C.S., board certified in general, vascular, cardiac, and thoracic surgery, is the founder and president of the New York Vein Treatment Center, a premier medical facility dedicated to complex evaluation and comprehensive treatment of circulatory disorders of lower extremities.

Dr. Khitin is recognized worldwide for his accomplishments in the field of circulation and has pioneered in-office management of vascular diseases with unprecedented results. Utilizing treatment modalities ranging from conservative traditional therapeutic methods to the most advanced medical technologies, Dr. Khitin achieved the highest level of expertise in area of prevention, diagnosis and treatment of pathological conditions affecting venous circulation.

Below, he tackles three common misconceptions about varicose veins and explains why believing these myths can be hazardous to your health.

Link to British Medical Journal study: http://www.bmj.com/content/350/bmj.h2135

Myth #1: “Varicose veins are simply a cosmetic issue and they have nothing to do with my health.”

This is false and ignoring your varicose veins could be dangerous to your health. Despite common believe, varicose veins are not an independent disease, but only a symptom, coincidentally not very common one, of a serious disease called venous insufficiency. People affected by venous insufficiency do always have varicose veins. Rarely, however, varicosities are seen by a naked eye, but they always can be located with duplex ultrasound.

It is not, therefore, varicose veins that can get you in trouble, but rather the disease responsible for their development: venous insufficiency, with its numerous symptoms and dreaded complications. Other signs of venous insufficiency include aches and pains, heaviness and tiredness, muscle cramps, swelling of feet and ankles, formation of spider veins, burning, coldness and itching, fatigue, difficulties walking and particularly standing, restless leg syndrome and many others. Left untreated, the disease progresses and eventually leads to complications, such as infection, blood clots, trophic ulcers, bleeding and even skin cancer.

The one indisputable characteristic of venous diseases is that they are progressively destructive over time, and neglecting them is often the worst choice you can make. By taking care of your varicose veins early upon their appearance, you can prevent their further progression and development of complications, protecting yourself from years of pain and suffering.

Myth #2: Men are not at the risk of developing varicose veins

The number of men suffering from vein diseases has steadily been on the rise over the last decade due to multiple socio-economic reasons.

Such occupations that require prolonged standing, like police officers do, or even prolonged sitting, such as driving a truck, and heavy lifting, such as construction workers are required to do, are especially at high risk of development of venous insufficiency. Some other so-called “risk factors” of venous insufficiency include increased body weight or height, prolonged immobility or even sedentary life style, chronic constipation, enlarged prostate, family history of vein disease and many more.

Finally, men much more likely than women perceive varicose veins, spider veins or any other visible symptom of venous insufficiency, as a purely cosmetic issue, rather than a tiny tip of a huge iceberg hidden from eyes, but unavoidably dangerous. Men, therefore, typically seek medical at more advanced stages of venous disease and are more likely to develop disabling forms of the disease and to suffer from its complications.

Myth #3. “My medical insurance WON’T PAY for my treatment, because my varicose veins are rather cosmetic and not health problem, they are not a real disease and affect only my appearance, but not my well-being."

Since, as we mentioned previously, varicose veins are merely one of many symptoms of serious venous disease, their treatment is nearly always covered by prevailing majority of healthcare insurance plans. Furthermore, because prevention or early intervention preclude development of serious circulatory problems in the future, it is actually more cost effective for insurance companies not only to pay for the treatment, but also to encourage early diagnosis and participation in screening programs.

We recommend visiting a qualified physician specialized in medical management of venous diseases for in depth consultation to explore your options for diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of pathological conditions affecting your veins.

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