Veritas Genetics Advances Access to Cancer Prevention with New Test for High-Risk Breast and Ovarian Cancer Patients

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Veritas Genetics continues to advance hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) prevention with the introduction of myBRCA HiRisk. As a new 26-gene screening panel, myBRCA HiRisk is a comprehensive HBOC screening test specifically designed for high-risk populations.

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Veritas Genetics continues to advance hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) prevention with the introduction of myBRCA HiRisk. As a new 26-gene screening panel, myBRCA HiRisk is a comprehensive HBOC screening test specifically designed for high-risk populations. Priced at $299 USD, myBRCA HiRisk is a reflection of the company’s global mission to make disease prevention and early detection through genetic testing more accessible.

Earlier this year, Veritas introduced its myBRCA screening test for BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes as the most out-of-pocket affordable ($199) breast and ovarian cancer screening test. myBRCA is currently offered in over 20 countries worldwide and received the European CE mark in 2015.

“Screening for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, as offered through the myBRCA test, should be the first step in a HBOC cancer prevention regimen for most people,” according to Veritas Genetics Chief Medical Officer Dr. Joseph Thakuria. “The needs of patients in the high-risk category,” he emphasizes, “are served much better with the more comprehensive approach offered with our new myBRCA HiRisk multigene panel.”

A recently published clinical study performed over 10 years at Massachusetts General, Stanford and Beth Israel Deaconess hospitals supports this approach. The study concluded that, “in a clinically representative cohort, multigene panel testing for HBOC risk assessment yielded findings likely to change clinical management for substantially more patients than does BRCA1/2 testing alone.” This approach may improve clinical outcomes for high-risk individuals and their families and “will improve cancer risk assessment and management recommendations for mutation-affected individuals across a broad spectrum of cancer predisposition genes.”1

Veritas Genetics’ high-risk panel test identifies germline mutations in 26 genes, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are associated with increased risk for developing breast and ovarian cancer as well as other associated cancers. myBRCA HiRisk also tests for structural rearrangements in BRCA1 and BRCA2.

The myBRCA HiRisk panel also includes genes known to be associated with Lynch syndrome, Cowden syndrome, Li-Fraumeni syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and several other genetic syndromes, including Bloom syndrome, Fanconi Anemia, and Ataxia Telangiectasia.

“A concern with multigene panel testing that needs to be considered is the higher rate of variants of uncertain significance (VUS) and the fact that many of the genes we are looking at are involved in other forms of cancer,” acknowledges Dr. Thakuria. “Multigene panel testing like myBRCA HiRisk is primarily recommended for patients that fall in a high-risk category, especially those who tested negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2 despite their high-risk profile. High-risk patients are likely already talking with their doctors about these kinds of testing options and the possibility of VUSs,” he adds.

myBRCA HiRisk will be available through veritasgenetics.com starting in Q1 of 2016. It requires a physician’s order, can be performed using a saliva or blood sample, and is done at a Veritas Genetics’ CLIA-certified laboratory. Pre- and post-testing genetic counseling is included and available either from Veritas Genetics directly or from healthcare institutions ordering the test for their patients.

About Veritas Genetics
Veritas Genetics is a global pioneer in disease prevention through accessible genetic information. By removing the barriers to genetic screening, Veritas empowers individuals and doctors to make informed decisions that can lead to disease prevention and longer and healthier lives. The company was founded by leaders in genomics from Harvard Medical School and is headquartered in Boston, with additional labs and offices in Europe (Luxembourg) and Asia (Shanghai).

1 Desmond A, et al., “Clinical Actionability of Multigene Panel Testing for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk Assessment”, JAMA Oncol, 2015; 1(7):943-951. doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2015.2690 JAMA

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Emily R. Pellerin
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