American College of Mohs Surgery Annual Meeting to Highlight Advances in Skin Cancer Treatment, Reconstruction

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Dermatologists, surgeons, pathologists, academics and others gather for compelling slate of scientific sessions

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"I believe gatherings like this one are vital," said ACMS President John G. Albertini, MD. "We have the opportunity to connect, collaborate and inspire one another in meaningful ways that help grow our knowledge base and empower us..."

The American College of Mohs Surgery (ACMS), an organization of 1,400 fellowship-trained skin cancer and reconstructive surgeons specializing in the Mohs micrographic surgical technique used to treat skin cancer, will hold its 49th Annual Meeting from Thursday, April 28 through Sunday, May 1 at the Rosen Shingle Creek in Orlando.

Physicians will explore the latest advances in the treatment of skin cancer, discuss recent research findings in the field of Mohs micrographic surgery and cutaneous oncology, and explain new techniques in reconstruction that promote optimal surgical outcomes.

The sessions focusing on reconstruction techniques feature distinguished guest speakers who will share their expertise in the areas of plastic surgery, hand surgery and transplantation, dermatopathology, ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgery, and melanoma:

  •     Benjamin Chang, MD, FACS, is Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery in the Division of Plastic Surgery at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center and specializes in hand surgery and the treatment of melanoma.
  •     Stephen J. Kovach III, MD, is Assistant Professor of Surgery in the Division of Plastic Surgery and the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Pennsylvania. His practice consists of reconstructive surgery, with an emphasis on microsurgical reconstruction of the extremities for oncologic, traumatic, and acquired defects.
  •     Rosalie Elenitsas, MD, is Professor of Dermatology and Director of Penn Cutaneous Pathology Services, the dermatopathology laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania. A practicing dermatologist and dermatopathologist, her academic interest is in melanoma and melanocytic lesions.
  •     Wendy W. Lee, MD, MS, is director of UM Cosmetic Medicine, a multidisciplinary cosmetic group involving the departments of ophthalmology, dermatology, ENT and plastic surgery at the University of Miami. She specializes in ophthalmic plastic and reconstructive surgery with a special interest in aesthetic medicine.

Together, Drs. Kovach and Chang will anchor three consecutive sessions on Saturday, April 30. From 8:30-9:15 am, “Mohs Surgery of the Nail Unit” will describe approaches to performing Mohs surgery for nail tumors; from 9:15-9:45 am, “Essential Principles to Optimize Surgical Outcomes of the Hand” will describe the key elements of Mohs surgery of the hand; and from 9:45-10:15 am, “Essential Principles to Optimize Surgical Outcomes of the Foot” will explore pre-op and post-op care related to undergoing Mohs surgery of the foot.

Dr. Elenitsas will serve as a panelist for “Pathology of Specialty Tumors: DFSP, Extramammary Paget’s Disease, AFX, and Sebaceous Tumors” from 3:00-4:00 pm on Friday, April 29. This session focuses on identifying high-risk attributes of rare cutaneous tumors and the best treatment approach for them.

Dr. Lee will take part in two consecutive sessions focused on the ocular region. From 1:00-1:30 pm Saturday, “Eyelid Essentials for the Mohs Surgeon: Gross and Microscopic Anatomy” will explore relevant anatomic structures important to preservation of form and function of the periocular region; from 1:30-2:30 pm, “Periocular Reconstruction” will focus on appropriate reconstructive options to repair Mohs surgery defects of the periocular region.

The meeting’s scientific program also draws upon the significant expertise of ACMS members for a number of notable sessions. These include topics like enhancing pre-op and post-op patient experiences, strategies to achieve perfect Mohs frozen sections, and reconstructions using Rhombic, Bilobed, Dorsal Nasal Rotation, and Nasolabial Transposition Flaps that will identify the specific steps involved in performing these four common flaps and select appropriate uses of each. In another session, members of the International Transplant Skin Cancer Collaborative will identify and discuss appropriate management strategies for skin cancer in solid organ transplant patients.

Five smaller concurrent sessions held from 7:00-8:15 am on Thursday, Friday and Saturday mornings will focus on one of each of the following topics: Intermediate Reconstruction/Flap Refinement, Advanced or Staged Reconstruction, Cutaneous Oncology, Mohs Surgery/Pathology/Ancillary Procedures, and Career Development/Leadership/Volunteerism.

“These Morning Mini-Sessions allow attendees to tailor the curriculum to their particular interests,” said ACMS Scientific Program Committee Chair Christopher Miller, MD. “We also have expanded opportunities for members to present original research, and a new “Rapid Pearls” abstract session features two-minute tips to improve Mohs surgery technique, frozen section pathology, reconstructive surgery, or practice management.”

ACMS members and fellows-in-training have the opportunity to take the online Diagnostic Quality Control Self-Examination in which 10-12 real-life challenging Mohs slides and rare tumors are reviewed with the purpose of going beyond the “bread and butter” of surgeons’ routine practice. Through the exam, fellowship-trained Mohs surgeons are able to maintain their proficiency in reading tumor pathology and experience a unique method to advance their knowledge.

"I believe gatherings like this one are vital," said ACMS President John G. Albertini, MD. "We have the opportunity to connect, collaborate and inspire one another in meaningful ways that help grow our knowledge base and empower us to see beyond the silos of our daily practices."

For details including the Program at a Glance, guest speaker bios, onsite registration information, and more, visit mohscollege.org/annualmeeting.

About the ACMS
The American College of Mohs Surgery (ACMS) is a membership organization of nearly 1,400 fellowship-trained skin cancer and reconstructive surgeons specializing in the Mohs micrographic surgical technique used to treat skin cancer. The ACMS serves as the voice of the specialty, promoting and advancing the highest standards of patient care through fellowship training, research, education and public advocacy. The organization was founded in 1967 by Dr. Frederic E. Mohs, who pioneered the technique of removing skin cancer in stages, one tissue layer at a time, resulting in minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissue. The ACMS is the only organization that requires members to have completed an extensive one- to two-year fellowship training program after completing their years of residency training. Learn more at mohscollege.org and skincancermohssurgery.org.

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Brett Kell
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