Construction Industry Analyzed & 2017 Forecasts for US and Netherlands in New Research Reports at RnRMarketResearch.com

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RnRMarketResearch.com adds Latest Reports on Construction Industry for United States of America and Netherlands to its store.

RnRMarketResearch.com adds Latest Reports on Construction Industry for United States of America and Netherlands to its store.

The US construction industry declined at a CAGR of -5.32% during the review period (2008–2012). This was largely a result of the country’s economic downturn, as well as the global financial crisis and subsequent austerity measures implemented by the government. Negative growth was experienced by all construction categories except infrastructure construction.

Residential construction was the largest market in the US construction industry, accounting for 30.6% of the industry’s total value. However, the residential market value declined at a CAGR of -7.42% during the review period, as a result of unfavourable economic conditions which making it difficult for US households to repay housing debt. Prospective buyers, especially those looking to get onto the property ladder, are also finding it difficult to secure mortgages without being asked to pay huge deposits.

Get a copy of US report @ http://www.rnrmarketresearch.com/construction-in-the-us-key-trends-and-opportunities-to-2017-market-report.html

Commercial construction recorded a CAGR of -13.82% during the review period, which was the largest decline out of all the construction markets in the US. The country’s retail real estate market has seen subdued levels of investment over the last two years, and the retail sector has seen subdued levels of investment since 2008. Consumer spending has been cautious, owing to high levels of unemployment, low wage growth and an unfavourable economic outlook. The fear of government spending cuts and forthcoming tax hikes encouraged businesses to restrain from investment. With a scarcity of construction projects and surpass cuts by government employers, the country’s office vacancy rate dropped to its lowest level in 2012.

The country’s infrastructure construction market output is forecast to record a CAGR of 5.97% over the forecast period. The US invested heavily in infrastructure projects during the review period and is anticipated to continue to invest over the forecast period. Owing to the extension of roads and rail networks, the expansion of air and marine ports and a strong pipeline of various infrastructure construction projects, US infrastructure construction output is expected to continue to grow over the forecast period.

Commercial construction is expected to be the fastest-growing construction market, with an anticipated CAGR of 6.13% over the forecast period. This is expected to be a result of various factors including low benchmark interest rates, declining unemployment rates and government initiatives aiming to stimulate the economy.

The Dutch construction market recorded a CAGR of -4.16% during the review period (2008–2012). All construction categories registered negative growth over this period. This is largely a result of the economic slowdown following the financial crisis and austerity measures implemented by the Dutch government.

Residential construction was the largest construction category in the Dutch construction industry, with a 45.1% share of the industry’s total value in 2012. Despite this, prospects for growth in the residential construction market remain bleak, as depressed economic conditions are making it difficult for Dutch households to repay housing debt. Prospective buyers, especially those looking to get onto the property ladder, as well as households looking to refinance their debt, are finding it difficult to secure mortgages. There looks to be little improvement of this situation in the short term, as the government implements measures to protect the banking system from the risk of large mortgage defaults.

Get a copy of Dutch report @ http://www.rnrmarketresearch.com/construction-in-the-netherlands-key-trends-and-opportunities-to-2017-market-report.html

Commercial construction recorded a CAGR of -5.17% during the review period, the largest decline of all construction markets in the Netherlands. The country’s retail sector has recorded subdued levels of investment since 2008. Consumer spending is cautious, owing to large debt, low wage growth and a depressed economic outlook. While prime retail centers such as Amsterdam and Rotterdam continue to exhibit high occupancy rates and stable rents, secondary retail locations are coming under increased pressure. Secondary centers such as Schiedam, Gouda, Tilburg and Almelo are facing increasing vacancy rates. The retail sector, in particular the non-food retail segment, is expected to stay depressed in the short term, as government spending cuts and an increase in VAT puts further pressure on the domestic market.

The Netherlands has well-developed infrastructure, consisting of several modern seaports, inland waterways, airports, highways and railroads, and is a dominant European logistics location. The infrastructure construction market, however, recorded a CAGR of -2.23% during the review period. Large budget cuts, as a part of the government’s austerity measures, affected the growth of the market. Furthermore, budget cuts to road infrastructure construction were announced in November 2012. The infrastructure construction category is expected to record a moderate CAGR of 0.87% over the forecast period.

Industrial construction is expected to be the fastest-growing construction category, with a projected CAGR of 0.26% during the forecast period. Low domestic demand and virtually no growth forecast for the eurozone in 2013 will market growth.

Browse more reports on Construction Industry @ http://www.rnrmarketresearch.com/reports/manufacturing-construction/construction

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