Rush for Texas Drivers’ Licenses Sparks DPS Delays

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Top Missed Questions on Texas Driver Permit Practice Tests

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"There's a real sense of urgency"

The Texas Department of Public Safety (TxDPS) administers approximately 1,000 road tests per weekday, on average. While the typical wait for a road test can take a few weeks, TxDPS’ busy summer season can extend that wait to a few months. For parents looking to make sure their teens are licensed to drive before going back to school, the time is now.

To help new drivers secure a learner license, DriversEd.com by eDriving, the No. 1 provider of driver’s education in the U.S., has revealed the top questions Texan teens get wrong on its practice permit tests. To determine the questions most frequently answered incorrectly, DriversEd.com analyzed the answers to thousands of practice test questions. Interested teens can test their knowledge and prepare themselves to ace the test on the first try, getting them one step closer to obtaining a license this summer.

Texas Drivers Education

Drivers 25 and younger are required to complete Texas drivers ed before applying for a license. The traffic signs and rules of the road exam provided during the course serves as the official state knowledge exam. Each drivers ed student has up to three chances to pass it with score of at least 70%. If the student does not pass the test by the third time it is taken, the student must retake the course or that portion of the program.

Because of TxDPS’ “three strikes and you’re out” rule, and given the wait for road test appointments, it’s important for students to pass the knowledge exam on their first try. No student wants to do double the work, pay additional fees, and retake drivers ed.

“We know parents feel a real sense of urgency this time of year to make sure their teens are prepared to pass the official exam on the first try,” explained Justin McNaull, a traffic safety advocate and DriversEd.com spokesperson. “We also know how valuable practice can be, which is why we offer our students free, practice learner license tests when they take our Texas online drivers ed course.”

The Inside Scoop -- Texas commonly missed practice drivers test questions

Of the nine questions most frequently answered incorrectly on DriversEd.com Texas practice permit tests, five relate to turning, overtaking or passing, and giving right of way. One question highlighted Texas distracted driving laws, and the remaining three questions focused on road signs, liability insurance requirements, and applicability of speed limits.

Key Findings:

Only one out of every five students correctly identify when a driver may cross a solid double yellow line in the center of a roadway

75% of students fail to recognize the correct highway sign used to identify a short highway in a city or urban area known as a “Loop”

70% of students are unaware that a posted speed limit of 55mph does not allow drivers to maintain that speed during inclement weather or other unfavorable driving conditions

Top Three Missed Questions on Texas Practice Permit Tests (Source: DriversEd.com)

1: Dos & Don’ts of Turning Left from Center Lane
“When making a left turn from a center lane (which is bordered by a solid and broken line on each side), you may enter this lane to make a left turn no more than ___ feet from the location of the turn.” This question appeared on more than 1,800 practice TxDPS permit tests studied by DriversEd.com. Only 342 students (18.85%) selected the correct answer of “300.” Most test takers chose shorter distances, which can affect safe turning practices as well as impact traffic flow.

2: Dos & Don’ts of Crossing a Double Yellow Line
“You must not cross a solid double yellow line in the center of a roadway to:”. Appearing on 3,071 of the practice tests analyzed by DriversEd.com, the correct answer, “Overtake another vehicle,” was selected by only 618 students (20.12%). Students often incorrectly chose answers related to turning safely.

3: Dos & Don’ts of Cellphone Use in a School Lane
“A driver is using his cell phone while passing through a school zone. Is it legal?’. Appearing on 2,225 of the tests, just 518 students (23.28%) selected the correct answer of “It is illegal unless the driver is at least 18 years of age and using a hands-free device.” Texas law prohibits drivers of any age from texting or talking using a handheld cell phone while driving in a school zone. Moreover, it is illegal for drivers under 18 to text or use a mobile device while operating a vehicle. And effective Sept. 1, 2017, texting while driving will be illegal for all Texas drivers.

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