Equine Vet Offers Tips for Horses on Stall Rest

Share Article

Vetoquinol USA Equine Specialist Focuses on How to Provide Comfort to a Confined Horse

“Unfortunately, stall rest is sometimes necessary for recovering horses, but it doesn’t have to be stressful for you and your horse if you’re properly prepared and equipped,” says Dr. Hill.

Stall rest, a prescribed solution that many horse owners dread, is sometimes a necessary part of owning a horse. Like the name, the goal is to rest, however being alone in a stall can be stressful for a horse that’s injured, recovering from surgery or being treated medically. While stall rest may be best for your horse to aid in recovery, there are some recommended steps to take to assure both horses and owners get through stall rest with the least amount of stress. Gene Hill, DVM, an equine specialist at Vetoquinol USA, provides some tips for successful equine stall rest:

  • Home sweet home. The inside of the stall should be set up as comfortably as possible. Providing good ventilation, enough light and a well bedded stall is essential to help your horse feel at home. If he doesn’t usually like feeling confined, occasionally providing a space near a door or with a view of the pasture may help. Ask your vet what’s best for your horse taking into account his or her injury and personality.
  • Friends are okay. The saying “misery loves company” applies to many horses! Frequently horses tolerate confinement better with one of their pasture mates. If your horse has a friend who would be a good babysitter, if he needs one, don’t hesitate to use him. Additionally, goats can be good companions to help horses deal with the sudden solitude that stall rest may bring.
  • Watch his weight. We know we should cut the feed of a convalescent animal for attitude and health reasons. He won’t use the daily calories during stall rest that he would when being ridden. Any weight your horse gains while recuperating he will need to lose when he goes back to work. Mixed hays with majority grass type are ideal forage for horses on stall rest and to help ease any boredom, a variety of slow grazer nets may help. Be sure to consult your veterinarian about your horses’ nutritional needs while recovering.
  • Help her relax. Consider a natural supplement, such as Zylkene Equine, which contains a unique milk-derived protein, alpha-casozepine, which can help horses cope with stressful situations. Be sure to ask your vet what’s best for your horse taking into account his or her injuries and medical records.

“Unfortunately, stall rest is sometimes necessary for recovering horses, but it doesn’t have to be stressful for you and your horse if you’re properly prepared and equipped,” adds Dr. Hill. “Horse owners are lucky that there is a natural product available for these times that helps improve the horse’s quality of life while on stall rest and during other stressful situations, such as trailer loading and travel.”

Zylkene Equine is available through veterinary offices. To learn more about Zylkene and Vetoquinol USA, visit http://www.barnchats.com.

About Vetoquinol USA:
Headquartered in Fort Worth, Texas, Vetoquinol USA is owned by Vetoquinol USA, an independent, family-owned French pharmaceutical company founded in 1933. Dedicated exclusively to animal health, Vetoquinol USA is focused on the development, production and marketing of FDA, EPA, NASC and AAFCO-regulated pharmaceutical, nutritional and dermatological products for small and large animals. Vetoquinol’s livestock division offers products for horses and cattle to assist owners and veterinarians with joint health, pain management, immune support, behavior and general care. For more information, visit http://www.barnchats.com, http://www.facebook.com/BarnChats, http://www.Instagram.com/BarnChats

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Sierra Brown
RLA Collective
+1 (914) 241-0086 Ext: 1011
Email >
Barn Chats by Vetoquinol Equine
since: 08/2016
Like >