Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors and the American Board of Family Medicine Develop National Family Medicine Graduate Survey

Share Article

Research has continually shown a decade-long decline in the scope of practice of family physicians, despite residency training designed to encompass all areas of primary care, obstetrics, impatient and ambulatory care. These findings raise questions about whether there is a lack of training, a lack of practice, or employer restrictions that limit opportunities for family physicians.

Research has continually shown a decade-long decline in the scope of practice of family physicians, despite residency training designed to encompass all areas of primary care, obstetrics, impatient and ambulatory care. These findings raise questions about whether there is a lack of training, a lack of practice, or employer restrictions that limit opportunities for family physicians.

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires family medicine residency programs to survey their graduates. In 2014, the Association of Family Medicine Residency Directors (AFMRD) and the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) convened a steering committee to identify the priorities for a national graduate survey, with the idea of using data collected for ABFM business purposes to fulfill the ACGME graduate survey requirement.

The survey was developed based on items in the ABFM’s certification and recertification questionnaires. The topic list was reviewed by several family medicine organizations and the authors used feedback from each organization to map the draft survey. After multiple reviews and revisions, the first pilot survey was emailed to a national group of recent residency program graduates. After review and revision of a second pilot survey, the final survey was completed and included four content areas: Practice and Work Schedule, Adequacy of Training and Scope of Practice, Satisfaction, and Professional Activity. The inaugural survey was conducted in 2016 with data fed back to residencies in early 2017.

The complete article can be found at: http://www.jgme.org/doi/full/10.4300/JGME-D-17-00007.1

Correspondence and inquiries should be addressed to: Amanda K. H. Weidner, MPH, University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, Box 354696, Seattle, WA 98195-4696, 206.221.4108, fax 206.685.0610, aweidner@uw.edu

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Jane Ireland

Jane Ireland
Visit website