FlexJobs' Survey Finds More Professionals Struggling With Work-Life Balance

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86% Report that work conflicts with their efforts to take care of overall health

"It is very clear that the further adoption of flexible work arrangements can provide healthier and more sustainable benefits--economic, health, social, and more--to both workers and organizations,” said Sara Sutton Fell, Founder and CEO of FlexJobs

FlexJobs recently surveyed over 1,200 people to determine how their work life impacts their work-life balance, relationships, health, stress levels, physical fitness frequency, and more. According to the January 2018 results, only 30% of people are currently satisfied with their work-life balance, compared to 45% who reported being satisfied with their work-life balance in the same survey three years ago. Additionally, 37% of respondents today report being stressed by their level of work-life balance, up from 29% in 2015.

According to a Mental Health America study, nearly two-thirds of workers believe that their job is having a significantly negative impact on their mental and behavioral health. This resonates with the 86% in FlexJobs’ survey report who responded that work conflicts with their efforts to take care of their overall health.

However, additional findings from FlexJobs’ survey indicate that flexible work can significantly improve workers’ work-life balance, physical and mental health, and relationships. Eighty-nine percent thought having a job with work flexibility would help them be healthier and take better care of themselves. Flexible work refers to professional-level jobs that have a telecommuting, flexible schedule, freelance, or part-time component.

“Poor work-life balance continues to be a major, chronic issue for today’s workforce, and despite more conversations about the topic, the problem seems to be getting worse,” said Sara Sutton Fell, founder and CEO of FlexJobs. “Employers really need to pay attention when the overwhelming majority of workers say that work flexibility would make their lives better is combined with the fact that flexible work has proven bottom line benefits to companies. It is very clear that the further adoption of flexible work arrangements can provide healthier and more sustainable benefits--economic, health, social, and more--to both workers and organizations.”

Key data regarding the impact of flexible jobs on personal health and non-romantic relationships:

  • 94% thought it would have a positive impact on their personal life.
  • 89% thought a flexible job would help them take better care of themselves.
  • 88% believed it would decrease their levels of stress.
  • 69% thought it would increase the frequency they exercised.
  • 88% said it would create more time to spend with family.
  • 78% thought it would help them be a better friend.

Key data regarding the impact of flexible jobs romantic relationships:

  • 44% thought having a flexible job would make their sex lives better, and another 30% were optimistic it would (i.e. having less stress in their lives would make them happier, feel more attractive, have more time for their partners, etc.).
  • 84% thought it would help them be a more attentive spouse/partner/significant other.
  • 53% thought it would increase time available for dates/date nights.
  • 47% said it would benefit their romantic relationship, and another 31% were hopeful it would.

Key data regarding the impact of flexible jobs for working parents:

Of the more than 500 respondents with children 18 and under living at home, 95% thought having a job with work flexibility would help them be a better parent. 91% thought it would help them be healthier and take better care of themselves.

Working parents also anticipated an improvement in the quality of their romantic relationships:

  • Nearly half of working parents 46% thought having a flexible job would improve their sex life, and another 31% were optimistic it would.
  • 86% thought it would help them be a more attentive spouse/partner/significant other.
  • 53% thought it would increase time available for dates/date nights.
  • 47% said it would benefit their romantic relationship, and another 31% were hopeful it would.

Some of the best jobs for work-life balance include social media manager, web designer, research analyst, and recruiting coordinator.

*Demographic breakdown of respondents: Age: 11% between 20-29 years old; 75% between 30-59 years old; 14% 60+. Relationship status: Not currently in a relationship (23%), Dating (4%), Serious/Engaged (17%), Married (56%). Children: 64% have children and 36% do not have children.

For the full results of the survey, please visit: https://www.flexjobs.com/blog/post/professionals-struggling-with-work-life-balance-flexjobs-survey/. To request additional information, please contact Kathy Gardner at kgardner(at)flexjobs.com.

About FlexJobs
FlexJobs is committed to helping people find a better way to work. As the leading online service for professionals seeking remote, flexible schedule, part-time, and freelance jobs, FlexJobs offers opportunities in over 50 career categories, ranging from entry-level to executive and freelance to full-time. FlexJobs also sets itself apart by providing job seekers with a better, safer, and more efficient way to find professional and legitimate flexible jobs. Having helped nearly three million people in their job searches, FlexJobs has appeared in CNN, CNBC, TIME, Forbes, The Wall Street Journal, Fast Company, and hundreds of other trusted media outlets. To further assist people in bettering their lives through flexible and remote work, FlexJobs' Founder & CEO Sara Sutton Fell has also launched two additional partner sites, Remote.co and 1 Million for Work Flexibility, to help provide education and awareness about the viability and benefits of remote working and work flexibility. Sutton Fell is also the creator of The TRaD* Works Forum (*Telecommuting, Remote, & Distributed), dedicated to helping companies leverage the benefits of telecommuting, remote and distributed teams.

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Kathy Gardner
FlexJobs
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