Chicagoland Biology Teacher Wins Second Term on NEA’s Executive Committee

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Delegates at the National Education Association’s annual convention re-elect Eric Brown

Illinois teacher Eric Brown, running for re-election to NEA's Executive Committee, speaks at the 97th NEA Representative Assembly in Minneapolis on July 2, 2018.

My passion is to inspire and activate NEA members to lead in their schools and communities, and to protect what we care about most — students and public education. —NEA Executive Committee Member Eric Brown

Chicagoland biology teacher Eric Brown won a second term on NEA’s Executive Committee, the highest level governing body that oversees and helps establish policy for the 3 million-member National Education Association, the nation’s largest union. Delegates elected Brown, a biology teacher at Evanston Township High School in Evanston, Illinois for a second three-year term that begins September 1.

“My passion is to inspire and activate NEA members to lead in their schools and communities, and to protect what we care about most — students and public education,” said Brown. “As a high school science teacher and former local president, I use my experience to guide my work with local and state affiliates across the country to counter assaults and lift up our voices.”

Brown is a biology teacher at Evanston Township High School just north of Chicago. With nearly 20 years in the classroom, he is the former president of his local, the Evanston High School Teachers Council. He grew up in Cleveland, Ohio, and became a teacher because he believes we have a duty to honor those who paved the way for us, and the privilege of helping those who will come after us.

“During his first term on the Executive Committee, Eric has been a steadfast advocate who shows new educators what the union can do for them and their students,” said NEA President Lily Eskelsen García, citing studies showing teachers with little or no preparation are more than twice as likely to leave the teaching profession. “Eric’s work on NEA’s New Ed Campaign has provided valuable leadership and mentorship to new teachers. We’re excited for Eric to continue this very important organizing work because everyone wins when there is a caring, qualified committed teacher in every classroom.”

With nearly 20 years in the classroom, he is the former president of his local, the Evanston High School Teachers Council. He grew up in Cleveland, Ohio, and became a teacher because he believes we have a duty to honor those who paved the way for us, and the privilege of helping those who will come after us.

Brown received his bachelor’s degree in biological science in 1997 and a master of science in education in 1999, both from Northwestern University. In his address to delegates attending the Representative Assembly, Brown drew on his experience as a biology classroom teacher.

“Things are passed down in our DNA, and it’s those chemicals of life that make us who we are,” added Brown. “But there are other things we inherit via the experiences we’ve had. We have the ability to pass on our DNA, and to pass on the learnings that we have from our experiences. I learned that the common thread — the DNA — that holds us all together as educators is our union, the NEA!”

The NEA Executive Committee consists of nine members — three executive officers and six members elected at-large by more than 6,000 delegates attending the NEA Representative Assembly, which was held this year in Minneapolis. The committee is responsible for general policy and interests of NEA and acts for the NEA Board of Directors in between its four regularly scheduled meetings each year.

For more information and a full listing of scheduled events, go to http://www.nea.org/ra

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The National Education Association is the nation’s largest professional employee organization, representing nearly 3 million elementary and secondary teachers, higher education faculty, educational support professionals, school administrators, retired educators and students preparing to become teachers. Learn more at http://www.nea.org.

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