Sahbu’s Goal is to Provide Education to 1,000 West African Children Before the End of 2012

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New infographic from Sahbu illustrates the difficulties of daily life in Liberia, where rape and child prostitution are practically the norm.

Sahbu-infographic

A new infographic from Sahbu paints a dire picture of daily life in Liberia, where AIDS and war have orphaned nearly 350,000 children.

When I returned home, I couldn’t get Liberia off my mind. I know a better life is possible for children in West Africa, but only if they have an opportunity to get educated.

Having already provided scholarships for more the 100 children to attend school in Liberia, Utah-based Sahbu now aims to help 1,000 more West African kids register for class before the end of 2012.

In the war-torn country it costs about $120 to send a child to school for a year. But the West African nation has one of the lowest rates of child literacy in the world because many Liberian families cannot afford the expense.

“These families can’t afford to send their kids to school for a month,” Sahbu founder Mitch Weight said.

Sahbu is a company focused on providing access to colleges for people in the United States who are looking to further their college education. Now when someone enrolls in school through Sahbu, the organization will provide a year’s education to a child in Liberia. Click here to learn more about sending a child to school in West Africa.

Weight fell in love with the West African people after spending the past four years adopting two young Liberian boys. An experienced traveler, Weight said he was not prepared for the poverty he encountered when he went to Liberia to pick up his sons in January 2012.

Through education, Weight said he intends to help stop the starvation, poverty and disease that have made Liberia one of the world’s most difficult places to live. A new infographic from Sahbu paints a dire picture of daily life in Liberia, where AIDS and war have orphaned nearly 350,000 children. Child prostitution is also rampant in Liberia. Some experts estimate that 80 percent of school girls have had sex for money, some as young as 10 years old.

“Understanding these hardships is difficult in the United States, where all children have access to public education, no questions asked,” Weight explained. “When I returned home, I couldn’t get Liberia off my mind. I know a better life is possible for children in West Africa, but only if they have an opportunity to get educated.”

Sahbu has partnered with Lifting Liberia, a non-governmental organization working to eradicate illiteracy, poverty and child prostitution in Liberia. When students in the United States approach Sahbu, searching for information about a college they would like to attend, Sahbu donates money to Lifting Liberia to send a West African child to school for a year.

Despite the anti-American protests flaring up in countries around the world, Weight said he plans to travel to volatile West Africa in October to make sure his organization is on track to provide education for more than 1,000 children before the end of the year.

“The $120 only covers tuition,” Weight explained. “We will also deliver school supplies, backpacks, uniforms, T-shirts and the other ancillaries the children need to go to school.”

About Sahbu

Sahbu serves individuals looking to further their education. For every person that enrolls in college through Sahbu’s education search tool, the company provides a year of education to a child in West Africa. Sahbu also offers essential tools and resources needed for prospective students to prepare for a prosperous educational experience. The company is guided by a mission to raise awareness of the crisis West African youth are experiencing and empower them through education. For more information, visit http://www.sahbu.com or our Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/sahbusearch.

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