The 2009 American Craft Council Show in Atlanta Celebrates Green

The Southeast's Largest Craft Show Features GreenCraft Artists who Transform Recycled & Sustainable Materials into Timeless Treasures

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an expression of the joy and faith shared by us all.

Atlanta (Vocus) February 17, 2009 - For the second consecutive year, the American Council Show in Atlanta (Mar. 13-

15, 2009) will feature artists that view "going green" as a method of artistic expression. GreenCraft Artists create all or a portion of their work with recycled materials and/or sustainable processes. Of the over 200 artists exhibiting at the 2009 American Craft Council Show in Atlanta (Mar. 13-15, 2009), one quarter or more meet the GreenCraft standard. From fine art pottery to metal works to distinctive wearable items to mixed media pieces, each of the American Craft Council's GreenCraft artists is creating collectible treasures from cast-offs and reducing pollution and landfill use. Below are a few of this year's GreenCraft artists:

At Mio Studio, jewelry artists Mayra Orama Muñiz and Erica Millner recycle rough materials into miniature sculptures that are meant to be worn. Among the materials used to produce their jewelry are exotic hardwoods and metals. Each piece is hand-carved into clean, modern designs.

Augusta, GA artist Paul Pearman brings new meaning to the term "belt buckle bling" with his mosaic belt buckles. Pearman uses stained glass and other recycled materials to produce works that incorporate an impressionistic style where glass resembles paint strokes, evoking movement. His works are considered "art for your hips" and have adorned the hips of stars such as Faith Hill, Cameron Diaz and Aerosmith's Steven Tyler.

Kirsten Stingle, of Alpharetta, GA, one of the most popular artists at the 2008 show, feels her fine arts degree in theatre has helped to hone her understanding of imagery and gestures in communication. She molds her clay art to mimic the human form, its various expressions, movements and postures. Cast-off items - bits of metal, fabric, buttons - help complete each piece in the direction of an unfolding story.

Sculptor Dave Caudill produces linear stainless steel structures that are meant to mimic lyrical gestures and rhythms. Caudill considers his work "an expression of the joy and faith shared by us all." He uses recycled steel and granite to produce many of his works and prefers stone pieces that have broken edges and unusual shapes. "Those unusual shapes often suggest improvisational designs that are especially lively. They are like my mother's quilts of remnants, offering warm feelings as I head into my own winter."

Visit these artists and their accomplished peers at the American Craft Council Show in Atlanta on Friday and Saturday, March 13-14: 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Sunday, March 15: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Cobb Galleria Centre. Regular admission is $12 for one day, $18 for a two-day pass and all three days' admission for $20. Children 12 and under are admitted free. American Craft Council members and those who join the non-profit organization at the show ($25 annual membership fee) are admitted free all weekend. To preview the show and to purchase tickets online, please visit: craftcouncil.org/atlanta.

Craft enthusiasts wanting an early opportunity to meet featured artists and buy their works before the show should plan to attend the Preview Party on Thursday, March 12 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Cobb Galleria Centre. Tickets for the Preview Party are $75 each and can be purchased at http://www.craftcouncil.org/atlanta. Proceeds from the Preview Party jointly benefit the Boys and Girls Club of Metro Atlanta/Youth Art Connection and the American Craft Council.

For directions to Cobb Galleria Centre, visit: http://www.cobbgalleria.com. Free parking is available.

About the American Craft Council:
The American Craft Council is a national, nonprofit public educational organization founded in 1943 by craft advocate Aileen Osborn Webb. The mission of the Council is to promote understanding and appreciation of contemporary American craft. Programs include the bimonthly magazine AMERICAN CRAFT, annual juried shows, the 2009 leadership conference, the Aileen Osborn Webb Awards honoring excellence, a specialized library, workshops and seminars.

MEDIA CONTACT:
Karin P. Koser    
KPK & Co.
404-636-9311
karin (at) kpkco.com

Johnny Crosskey
KPK & Co.
404-805-4146
jcrosskey (at) kpkco.com

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