New Book Helps Those with Bipolar Disorder Manage Diets - and Lives

Author Sarah Freeman recently published a new book entitled, "The Bipolar Diet: Managing Mood, Food and Weight." The book is designed to provide a roadmap for those with bipolar disorder on improving diet and making lifestyle changes that can improve both mental and physical health.

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It also discusses weight control as so many people experience significant weight gain as a side effect of their bipolar medication. 'The Bipolar Diet' also explains the food/mood connection, and how smart food choices can protect from mood swings into both mania and depression.

(PRWEB) August 5, 2009

Author Sarah Freeman has overcome many challenges when it comes to dealing with her bipolar disorder. Now, she hopes to share some of the insight she has gained through a recently published book entitled, "The Bipolar Diet: Managing Mood, Food and Weight."

The book provides a roadmap for those with bipolar disorder on improving diet and making lifestyle changes that can improve both mental and physical health.

Freeman, who was diagnosed with bipolar/manic depression in 2005, said that nutrition and diet should be of paramount concern for those being treated for the condition.

"When I first started taking medication for my bipolar disorder I gained over 40 pounds," Freeman said. It was because of this rapid weight gain and deterioration of her own health that she wrote this new book. Along the way, she learned a lot about the causes of her dietary troubles and her mood swings, as well as the seriousness of the risks associated with having bipolar disorder -- including a greatly increased risk of early death from diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

"I read a medical textbook that explained how many people with bipolar disorder also have reactive hypoglycemia -- that is low blood sugar that occurs one to three hours after a meal," she said. "The symptoms include fatigue, depression, irritability, foggy thinking, panic attacks, and even outbursts of rage. Thankfully there is a practical solution. By learning to eat in a way that stabilizes insulin and blood sugar, my moods improved dramatically, and I was able to easily shed all that unwanted fat."

In February 2009, the medical journal Psychiatric Services published findings showing that bipolar disorder can double the risk of early death from a range of medical conditions -- including some that can be controlled through diet and exercise.

"'The Bipolar Diet' explains how to protect yourself from illnesses like diabetes and heart disease that often co-occur with bipolar disorder," Freeman said. "It also discusses weight control as so many people experience significant weight gain as a side effect of their bipolar medication. 'The Bipolar Diet' also explains the food/mood connection, and how smart food choices can protect from mood swings into both mania and depression."

About Bipolar-Lives.com
Bipolar-Lives is one of the Internet's leading sites on bipolar disorder, offering a unique mix of the latest research, practical tools and personal stories. For more information, contact Freeman at 850-294-6806, or visit http://www.bipolar-lives.com.

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