Recent Article Reveals Medical Ghostwriting Suppressed Links Between Synthetic Hormones and Breast Cancer

A recent New York Times article, ''Senator Moves to Block Medical Ghostwriting,'' raises a heinous accusation, that Wyeth paid medical ghostwriters to suppress clinical evidence linking the use of synthetic hormone drugs to an increased risk of breast cancer.

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I am gratified that the truth may finally be coming to light

Jacksonville, Fla. (Vocus) August 21, 2009

A recent New York Times article, ''Senator Moves to Block Medical Ghostwriting,'' raises a heinous accusation, that Wyeth paid medical ghostwriters to suppress clinical evidence linking the use of synthetic hormone drugs to an increased risk of breast cancer.

"I am gratified that the truth may finally be coming to light," said C.W.Randolph, Jr., M.D., "Even after the 2002 National Institutes of Health, Women's Health Initiative Trial (WHI) irrefutably established that synthetic hormones (such as the popularly prescribed Premarin family of products) caused the risk of breast cancer to increase 26 percent, physicians continued to prescribe these drugs putting millions of women's lives in jeopardy. Why? Because they were misled by pharmaceutical-sponsored medical studies skewing the facts."

According to Dr. Randolph, a nationally recognized medical expert in the field of natural, or Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapies (BHRT), this type of evidence has existed for decades.

As early as 1941, Edgar Allen, M.D., Chair of Yale Medical School Anatomy Department, published an article in the medical journal Cancer Research on the propensity of estrogen to cause cancer in animals. Since that time, the output of medical research and clinical studies continued to mount until, in 2001, representatives from the National Cancer Institute and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) voted 8-1 to add synthetic estrogen to the nation's list of cancer-causing agents.

Recent revelations that Wyeth directed DesignWrite medical ghostwriters to deliberately deemphasize the links between synthetic hormone replacement therapies and breast cancer in published medical journals are bringing experts in the field of BHRT to answer the question of the purpose for manipulating this data.

''Because there is big money at stake,'' says Genie James, M.M.Sc., Executive Director of the Natural Hormone Institute. ''Prior to the WHI findings being made public in 2002, the Premarin-family of products was a 2.2 billion dollar pipeline.''

According to an article in The New York Times, since 2002, sales for Wyeth's Premarin family of products have plummeted 50 percent, and have continued to decline over the last several years.

Research in the U.S. and around the world supports BHRT as the treatment of choice for menopausal symptoms and conditions of hormone imbalance.

"The sad reality is that when marketing gets ahead of medical science, women's lives are put at risk," says James.

About C.W. Randolph, Jr., M.D.: Randolph is an internationally renowned expert in the field of bio-identical hormone replacement. He is a board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist who practiced as a compounding pharmacist. He is the co-founder of the Natural Hormone Institute, a Diplomat of the American Board of Holistic Medicine, and a member of the International Academy of Compounding Pharmacists. He coauthored ''From Belly Fat to Belly Flat, From Hormone Hell to Hormone Well,'' and ''In the Mood Again'' (Simon & Schuster 2010).

About Genie James, M.M.Sc.: Genie is nationally acknowledged as a change-agent for improved women's health. She is the co-founder and executive director of the Natural Hormone Institute. She coauthored ''From Belly Fat to Belly Flat, From Hormone Hell to Hormone Well,'' and ''In the Mood Again'' (Simon & Schuster 2010).

Media Contact
Nanette Noffsinger
Burke Hollow Media
(615) 776-4230
nanette(at)burkehollowmedia(dot)com

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