American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine Dean of Clinical Education Joins National Leaders to Develop Competencies for Pain Management Education

San Francisco’s American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine contributed their thoughts and expertise on the current state of pain management in The Expert Summit for Interprofessional Consensus on Pain Management Competencies at UC Davis.

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The American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine (ACTCM) has been at the forefront of educating students in Traditional Chinese Medicine in the Bay Area since its inception in 1980

Although the management of acute and chronic pain remains a challenge, pain education is lacking in many health science curricula, particularly for beginning students.

San Francisco, CA (PRWEB) September 04, 2012

This month, Dr. Steve Given, DAOM, from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine of San Francisco joined 29 of the nation’s top pain and education experts to develop competencies for pain management education at an intensive two-day summit hosted by UC Davis Health System.

“Although the management of acute and chronic pain remains a challenge, pain education is lacking in many health science curricula, particularly for beginning students,” said summit participant Judy Watt-Watson, president of the Canadian Pain Society and professor emerita for The Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing at the University of Toronto.

The Expert Summit for Interprofessional Consensus on Pain Management Competencies included leaders from several health-related disciplines—such as dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, physical therapy, psychology, social work and veterinary medicine— as well as educational experts and researchers.

The summit is part of the Interprofessional Pain Management Competency Program, a project to develop pain management core competencies and drive curriculum reform related to pain management. The program is led by Scott M. Fishman, professor and chief of pain medicine and vice chair of the department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine at UC Davis, and supported by The Mayday Fund, an organization dedicated to alleviating the incidence, degree and consequence of human physical pain.

“The current state of pain management competencies and content in schools of medicine and nursing, as well as other health professions, is inadequate,” Fishman said.

“The creation and distribution of core competencies in pain management that apply across professions and can be used worldwide can serve as a foundational step in improving the culture and content of care for adults and children with acute, chronic or end-of-life pain.”

A 2011 Institute of Medicine report revealed the need for improved pain education for health professionals due to increasing numbers of Americans coping with chronic pain as well as skyrocketing costs. According to the Institute of Medicine, an estimated 116 million American adults—more than the total affected by heart diseases, cancer and diabetes combined—suffer from chronic pain. Pain costs the nation up to $635 billion annually in medical treatment and lost productivity.

The summit participants worked over the two days to reach consensus on a framework for pain management competencies. They agreed the core competencies would cover four key areas:

  •     Multidimensional nature of pain
  •     Assessment and measurement
  •     Management of pain
  •     Clinical conditions: interprofessional, patient-centered care in context

The group plans to summarize the summit results in a journal article and full report within the next six months. Other means of dissemination, such as additional peer-reviewed publications, presentations at professional conferences and distribution to academic and professional organizations is also planned to encourage endorsement and application of the competencies in various health education programs throughout the world.

Dr. Steve Given was honored to be a part of this group. He has twenty years experience in acupuncture and Oriental medicine education and patient care, including his work as an AOM educator and academic administrator. His areas of clinical interest include orthopedics, HIV/AIDS, oncology and addiction treatment and believes the work of this program will support the education of acupuncture students in the future, and ultimately benefit patients.

For more information about the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, call (415) 282-9603 or visit ACTCM.edu. ACTCM’s clinic is located on the ACTCM campus at 450 Connecticut Street, San Francisco, California.

About the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine (ACTCM)
The American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine (ACTCM) has been at the forefront of educating students in Traditional Chinese Medicine in the Bay Area since its inception in 1980. The college offers two degree programs—the Master of Science in Traditional Chinese Medicine (MSTCM) and the Doctorate of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (DAOM). Both programs provide exceptional professional education and ACTCMs teaching clinic provides affordable, quality patient care.

Bay Area acupuncture treatment, as taught by ACTCM, restores balance and health, and is used for everything from chronic pain to drug dependence. It is also effective for allergy relief, weight loss, pain management and fertility treatment.