Men, Moods and Diabetes

A number of older men have shown concern for their sudden uncharacteristic tendency to have mood swings and exhibit aggressive behaviour. Responses to a questionnaire on http://www.OfficialDiabetesBlog.com have demonstrated that some men are worried that these mood changes are related to their diabetes or diabetes related symptoms.

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(PRWEB) October 11, 2006

A number of older men have shown concern for their sudden uncharacteristic tendency to have mood swings and exhibit aggressive behaviour. Responses to a questionnaire on http://www.OfficialDiabetesBlog.com have demonstrated that some men are worried that these mood changes are related to their diabetes or diabetes related symptoms.

Nutritional researcher Sam Graci notes that as men age, their hormonal health changes dramatically as testosterone levels are depleted and oestrogen levels rise. This is known as Andropause. When these hormonal changes are also compounded with the blood sugar fluctuations of type 2 diabetes, some unusual patterns of mood and emotions can manifest in older men.

What men eat, and when, affects the major hormones that keep them emotionally and physically fit. Dietitians and doctors also point to the benefits of regular exercise and communication in managing these issues.

Many men go through a period of guilt, anger and remorse when they find out they have type 2 diabetes. They know that, through their lifestyle choices, they may have contributed to the development of a condition that will change their life forever. Or they may blame others for ‘leading them’ to their current state.

The Better Information Network™ says that many people with diabetes respond emotionally to changes in their hormone levels and may experience strong mood swings. Stress induced emotions themselves can produce hyperglycemia, as the secretion of many hormones can counteract the actions of insulin and disrupt metabolic control.

A person with diabetes may express long-withheld emotions - sometimes chaotically. A diabetic patient may be unaware of even severe mood swings; and act as if a current emotion is a valid basis for long-term decisions. Emotional outbursts may follow minor events or small lifestyle changes.

For example, a person with diabetes may angrily criticise other family members, or suddenly announce an unusual decision to business associates. Yet they may also quickly forget such conversations. Criticised family members, and business associates affected by hasty decisions may respond with their own emotions and reduced trust of the diabetic person. Emotional conflicts can spiral to create chaos.

Stephanie Jakobi of The Better Information Network™ said, “While these facts will not eliminate the emotional pressures being faced by men, the knowledge and awareness that they are not going through these feelings alone can make it easier for them to seek help and discuss it with others.”

“There are many dietary, homeopathic, and lifestyle changes that a man dealing with these issues can make, to help combat mood swings. It’s a good idea to discuss the different options available with your health care professional,” she continued.

http://www.OfficialDiabetesBlog.com provides a forum where people can get together online and share their experiences and ideas. By raising awareness and building a diabetes community, The Better Information Network™ and http://www.OfficialDiabetesBlog.com are helping people understand diabetes and its symptoms better.

For more information or media enquires please contact Shaun Stenning on 0402 621 118 or email.

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