Lung Cancer Foundation of America Gives the Gift of Life This Holiday Season: Announces Inaugural $125,000 Scientific Research Grant

Lung cancer, the nation’s leading cause of cancer deaths for women and men remains the most under-funded, under-researched and under-supported cancer. There are currently no approved early detection tests for lung cancer. With a 5-year survival rate of only 15%, the prognosis for lung cancer has not changed in 40 years. A new organization, Lung Cancer Foundation of America (LCFA) is trying to change this reality, and save lives by dramatically increasing the five-year survival rate for all stages of lung cancer. LCFA will accomplish this by providing the necessary and critical funding for creative and leading edge lung cancer research programs. This Holiday Season, LCFA is giving the gift of life and hope by announcing its inaugural $125,000 scientific research grant in partnership with the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC).

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I am proud to announce our new collaboration with LCFA providing a $125,000 grant opportunity for innovative lung cancer research. By working together we can indeed make an impact." Paul Bunn, Executive Director of IASLC.

Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) December 22, 2009

Lung cancer, the nation’s leading cause of cancer deaths for women and men remains the most under-funded, under-researched and under-supported cancer. There are currently no approved early detection tests for lung cancer. With a 5-year survival rate of only 15%, the prognosis for lung cancer has not changed in 40 years. A new organization, Lung Cancer Foundation of America (LCFA) is trying to change this reality, and save lives by dramatically increasing the five-year survival rate for all stages of lung cancer. LCFA will accomplish this by providing the necessary and critical funding for creative and leading edge lung cancer research programs.

As an organization barely two years old, LCFA is proud to partner with the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) in announcing its inaugural Request for Proposal (RFP) for a research award in the amount of $125,000.00.    LCFA and IASLC are partnering to fund exciting research opportunities for molecular analysis of bio-specimens (blood, tissue, urine, etc.) collected as part of medium to large clinical trials. The focus will be on molecular features of tumors of patients, which will help in the selection of patients in need of therapy, and selection of optimal therapies for this subset of patients. The objectives of this RFP are to foster collaboration and interaction between basic researchers and clinical investigators to perform clinical translational research on promising predictive and prognostic markers. These studies should focus on clinical correlative or mechanistic studies that will be useful for cancer risk assessment, early detection, prognosis, and predicting response to therapy. Applications are due January 31, 2010. Applicants should be faculty members in the first 5 years of their faculty appointment, and need to explicitly define a senior mentor and mentoring plan as part of the proposal.

“I am proud to announce our new collaboration with LCFA providing a $125,000 grant opportunity for innovative lung cancer research,” said Paul Bunn, Executive Director of IASLC. “It is true that lung cancer research funding is not sufficient to cover the opportunities available nor to advance the field at the rate patients need. By working together we can indeed make an impact.”

LCFA is one of only a handful of private foundations devoted to the research of early detection and treatment of lung cancer. People assume that lung cancer research is well-funded – what they don’t realize is that most funding is earmarked for tobacco cessation and prevention programs, as well as other programs unrelated to lung cancer, and very little public and private funds actually go toward lung cancer research. As of 2006, there were less than 30 lung cancer specific foundations providing lung cancer research grants, all of which combined did not give more than $5 million dollars in grant money. At the same time, this year, lung cancer will claim more lives than breast, prostate, colon, liver, kidney and melanoma cancers – COMBINED, all of which underscores the importance of this grant and others like it.

About LCFA:
LCFA was established by two lung cancer survivors and a lung cancer widow. Although their life experiences vary greatly the three of them have come to the same realization…the poor survival rate for lung cancer is a direct result of the lack of funding for lung cancer research. Working with many of the top lung cancer researchers and clinicians in this country, LCFA has seen how lung cancer researchers are trying diligently to unlock the secrets unique to lung cancer. They have also witnessed the inordinate amount of time researchers spend in an effort to secure money to pay for the research, an effort that distracts them from their primary research function. The abysmal state of funding for lung cancer research also discourages new researchers who, instead, gravitate to where the money is, leaving a potential gaping hole in future lung cancer research programs. LCFA's mission is to save lives by dramatically increasing the five-year survival rates for all stages of lung cancer, the nation's leading cause of cancer deaths for both men and women. LCFA will accomplish this by providing the necessary and critical funding for creative and leading edge lung cancer research programs. http://lcfamerica.org/

About IASLC:
The purpose of IASLC is to promote the study of the etiology, the epidemiology, the prevention, the diagnosis, the treatment, and all other aspects of lung cancer and disseminate information about lung cancer to the members of the Association, to the medical community at large, and to the public. http://www.iaslc.org/

For more information contact Rachel Schwartz, PR AdvantEDGE Inc. http://pr-a.biz/

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