July is National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month

Allsup promotes treatment and access to resources; distributes free poster

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National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month poster is available for download at AllsupCares.com

Medical documentation from mental health professionals is critical when seeking Social Security disability benefits.

Belleville, Ill. (PRWEB) June 28, 2011

Mental illness is a leading cause of disability, yet nearly two-thirds of people with a diagnosable mental illness do not seek treatment, and racial and ethnic minorities in the U.S. are even less likely to get help, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). July is National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, and Allsup, a nationwide provider of Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) representation, is raising awareness of the importance of treatment in improving mental health and accessing resources that support wellness.

“Unfortunately, disparities in mental health care still prevent people in diverse communities from getting the treatment they need,” said NAMI Multicultural Action Center director Majose Carrasco. “The outcomes of poorer quality of care come at a high cost to our community.”

The U.S. Surgeon General reported in 2001 that minorities:

  • Are less likely to receive diagnosis and treatment for their mental illness.
  • Have less access to and availability of mental health services.
  • Often receive a poorer quality of mental health care.
  • Are underrepresented in mental health research.

“Poorly delivered or unmet mental health may be a major contributing factor as to why individuals from racial and ethnic minority groups are overrepresented in many of the nation’s most vulnerable populations,” said Henry Acosta, executive director of the National Resource Center for Hispanic Mental Health (NRCHMH).

Mental disorders are as disabling as cancer or heart disease in terns of premature death and lost productivity. From 2005-06, mental illness was the second-most frequent condition, after arthritis, causing activity limitation among adults 18-44 years old, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Social Security Administration reports that nearly one-third of disabled workers receiving SSDI benefits have a mental disorder.

The SSDI program provides monthly income based on the FICA taxes individuals have paid during their working years as well as eventual access to Medicare. Both of these benefits contribute to stability and access to care for people with mental illness. However, obtaining these benefits is difficult without medical evidence of a severe disability.

“Medical documentation from mental health professionals is critical when seeking Social Security disability benefits,” said David Bueltemann, Allsup manager of senior claims representatives. “Social Security relies on medical diagnoses and details about the doctors they visit, information on the medical facilities they’ve used, medications and their side effects, as well as information on the restrictions and limitations that have resulted from the mental illness.”

During National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, learn more about mental health treatment and resources available through NAMI at NAMI.org and NRCHMH at NRCHMH.org.

“Treatment works and all Americans deserve a transformed mental health system that provides quality and culturally competent services to all citizens, regardless of their race, ethnic and language capabilities,” said Mr. Acosta.

For referrals to mental health resources near you, call the NAMI HelpLine at (800) 950-NAMI (6264). For information on SSDI eligibility call (888) 841-2126 or visit Allsup.com.

For a free National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month poster, click here.

About Allsup
Allsup is a nationwide provider of Social Security disability representation and Medicare plan selection services. Founded in 1984, Allsup employs nearly 800 professionals who deliver specialized services supporting people with disabilities and seniors so they may lead lives that are as financially secure and as healthy as possible. The company is based in Belleville, Ill., near St. Louis.

About NAMI
The National Alliance on Mental Illness is the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization. Founded in 1979, NAMI has affiliates in every state and in more than 1,100 local communities across the country. As a national organization, NAMI focuses on mental health education; support and advocacy efforts to offer hope, raise awareness and initiate change throughout the United States.

About The National Resource Center for Hispanic Mental Health
The National Resource Center for Hispanic Mental Health is a private nonprofit charitable organization dedicated to promoting quality mental health services through policy development initiatives, training, technical assistance, research, data collection, best practice development, and anti-stigma and anti-discrimination campaigns. The NRCHMH specifically aims to reduce disparities and to increase treatment quality and availability of mental health services for Hispanics throughout the nation.

Contacts:

Tai Venuti
Allsup
(800) 854-1418 ext 8573
t(dot)venuti(at)allsupinc(dot)com    

Majose Carrasco                
NAMI
(703) 524-7600
majose(at)nami(dot)org                

Henry Acosta
NRCHMH
(609) 838-5488 ext 205
hacosta(at)nrchmh(dot)org

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