New Study Finds Yet Another Link to Cancer, Synthetic Hormones

Dr. Randolph says evidence against synthetic hormones is overwhelming, urges alternatives

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Women who choose to partake in hormone replacement therapy should be educated about the health risk associated with synthetic options

Jacksonville, FL (Vocus) July 21, 2009

A recent study has found that post-menopausal women who underwent synthetic hormone replacement therapy had a sharply increased risk of ovarian cancer. The study included 900,000 Danish women between the ages of 50 to 79 and resulted with scientists determining that 140 cases of ovarian cancer within an eight-year period could be linked to synthetic hormones.

"Women who choose to partake in hormone replacement therapy should be educated about the health risk associated with synthetic options," says C.W. Randolph, Jr., M.D. R. Ph., board-certified gynecologist and medical director of the Natural Hormone Institute. "A natural alternative to synthetic hormones like Prempro is safe and readily available - bioidentical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT)."

Sales of Prempro, the combined estrogen/progestin therapy marketed by Wyeth, have fallen 50 percent since 2002, the year a landmark study conducted by the Womens' Health Initiative found that use of synthetic estrogen/progestin was associated with an increased risk of cancer and heart disease.

"This new study only confirms what researchers and patients have known since 2002," says Randolph. "Synthetic hormones have been shown to have carcinogenic properties. However, it is important to understand why bioidentical hormones are a efficacious and safer alternative. BHRT is derived from plant sources and synthesized in a laboratory to have exactly the same molecular structure as the the hormones produced by the human body. The body's hormone receptors 'receive' BHRT medication perfectly, since it's identical to the hormones the body produces naturally. Post-menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes, weight gain, and moodiness are relieved without side effects or health risks."

Randolph urges women to research their options when it comes to hormone replacement therapy. "There is a wealth of new research available now to reassure women that BHRT is a smart choice," he says. "For example, studies conducted by Dr. Joel Hargrove at Vanderbilt Medical University and Dr. Abraham Morgentaler at Harvard University have found BHRT to be both safe AND effective."

Media Contact:
Melissa Ross
The Dalton Agency
904-398-5222

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