The Importance of Assigning Medical Power of Attorney

The Society of Certified Senior Advisors (SCSA) speaks out on the importance of properly assigning medical power of attorney. It is critical to ensure that Medical Power of Attorneys (POAs are used properly so that seniors’ wishes are being met and to help avoid conflicts amongst family and friends.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friend
Power of Attorney, POA, Medical, Assigning Power of Attorney, Durable
You must be willing to have in-depth conversations with your medical POA agent about your life, values, preferences, end-of-life care and spiritual or religious considerations.

Denver, CO (PRWEB) November 08, 2012

The Society of Certified Senior Advisors has released a new article about the significance of properly assigning medical power of attorney. This article will explain the differences in the many types of power of attorneys along with what is most important about what is called a “durable” power of attorney. Without POAs, seniors risk having their medical fate in the hands of someone who does not necessarily share their same views and ideas for their future. Though the idea of giving someone else medical power of attorney may generate fear for many seniors, the repercussions that may occur from not having one can produce disagreements amongst family and friends and in some cases even lengthy and costly court proceedings.

The article Assigning Medical Power of Attorney is Both Difficult and Easy, will explain when the time is right to assign a POA, an ideal individual to appoint as your POA Agent, how to legally create a POA and when and how a POA can be revoked.

Excerpts from this article:

“Your POA agent should be someone who has similar views about end-of-life issues and medical care, as well as someone who is willing to take responsibility and make hard decisions, if necessary. Also, you must be willing to have in-depth conversations with your medical POA agent about your life, values, preferences, end-of-life care and spiritual or religious considerations. You should have frequent discussions with this person, as your medical condition changes and as new medical techniques emerge.”

“Aging Care advises being “open and honest. Don't be afraid of hurting your kids' feelings. Talk about all of it. If you go outside the family to appoint anyone as your agent for healthcare, be sure it is a compassionate person who will work with, and not against your family.”
The Society of Certified Senior Advisors provides free resources and tools for its members as an ongoing commitment in helping professionals to understand the complex and dynamic lives of modern senior citizens. SCSA has a suite of information including educational webinars, educational guides, articles and more!

To access the full version of this article go to Medical Power of Attorney.

About Society of Certified Senior Advisors (SCSA):

SCSA educates and certifies professionals to work more effectively with their senior clients. As the leading provider of certification for professionals serving seniors, SCSA’s Certified Senior Advisor (CSA)® credential requires CSAs to uphold the highest ethical standards for the benefit and protection of the health and welfare of seniors. Accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies, the CSA http://www.csa.us/WhyBecomeACSA.aspx credential is the gold standard for professionals in all areas who work with the senior population. Through a comprehensive educational program, SCSA helps professionals understand the key health, social and financial issues that are important to the majority of seniors.