Hospital Healthcare Leaders Call For System-wide Programs for Medication Reconciliation, a Key Factor for Improving Patient Safety

Share Article

Medication reconciliation programs can help prevent or reduce medication errors and adverse events caused by them. Leading organizations involved in hospital healthcare, including the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, have endorsed a white paper published in the Journal of Hospital Medicine that outlines 10 key areas related to verifying that current patient medications are correct, medically safe and necessary.

AACN is the largest specialty nursing organization in the world, representing the interests of more than 500,000 nurses who are charged with the responsibility of caring for acutely and critically ill patients.

"Medication reconciliation prevents healthcare professionals from inadvertently giving, changing or omitting medications to patients."

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) added its bold voice to hospital healthcare leaders by endorsing a white paper that calls for system-wide programs for medication reconciliation — the process of verifying that current patient medications are correct, medically safe and necessary.

Making Inpatient Medication Reconciliation Patient Centered, Clinically Relevant and Implementable: A Consensus Statement on Key Principles and Necessary First Steps” appears in October’s Journal of Hospital Medicine. It outlines 10 key areas to progress medication reconciliation, including:

  •     Uniformly accepted definitions of medication and reconciliation
  •     Clearly defined roles of multidisciplinary participants in reconciliation
  •     Clinically meaningful reconciliation processes
  •     Comprehensive reconciliation across the continuum of care
  •     Mechanisms to prospectively and proactively identify patients
  •     Research to identify effective processes
  •     Dissemination of medication reconciliation strategies
  •     Integrated personal health records that transfer easily between care sites
  •     Healthcare and community-based partnerships
  •     Healthcare payment structures that align with medication safety goals

Among the organizations that endorsed the pivotal white paper: the American Academy of Pediatrics, Consumers Advancing Patient Safety, Institute for Healthcare Improvement, Institute for Safe Medication Practices and The Joint Commission.

Medication reconciliation is a key factor for improving patient safety. AACN Clinical Practice Manager Robi Hellman, RN, MSN, CNS, notes the implications of reducing medication-related errors at the point of care.

“Medication reconciliation prevents healthcare professionals from inadvertently giving, changing or omitting medications to patients. It also makes sure that medication changes get communicated to all those involved in patient care,” she explains.

About the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses: Founded in 1969 and based in Aliso Viejo, Calif., the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) is the largest specialty nursing organization in the world. AACN joins together the interests of more than 500,000 acute and critical care nurses and claims more than 230 chapters worldwide. The organization’s vision is to create a healthcare system driven by the needs of patients and their families in which acute and critical care nurses make their optimal contribution. To learn more about AACN, visit http://www.aacn.org, connect with the organization on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/aacnface or follow AACN on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/aacnme.

# # #

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Sherree Geyer
AACN
949-268-7573
Email >
Visit website