First-time contribution and publication of a large set of full color Abraham Lincoln photographs

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In celebration of the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial (2009), a substantial collection of digital color photographs of President Abraham Lincoln are being made available to the public.

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The Library of Congress image was released in reverse and had confused many people as to whether it was Lincoln. In reversing it back and coloring the image, we clearly see Gettysburg in 3-D, as if we were there. The added dimension of color makes the difference.

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For the first time, 120 photographs of President Abraham Lincoln have debuted in color showing the 16th President of the United States as he appeared in real life. The photographs are exact color reproductions of Abraham Lincoln photographs with historical artifacts like fingerprints etc. maintained from the original source images. The photos are being released with the publication of the book "Color of Lincoln" on January 18, 2009. The copyrighted photos are also available for public viewing as part of the Abraham Lincoln collection at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library in Springfield, Illinois. Two of the photographs were used as part of the fundraising commemorative T-shirts for the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission at the Lincoln Bicentennial Inaugural ceremonies.

These full color digital images are the culmination of a 5 year effort in digital colorization by Bryan Eaton, the main author and artist of the book, "Color of Lincoln". This restoration has enabled certain missed details to be visualized in the often artifact-clouded images. Besides single photographs of Abraham Lincoln, Bryan Eaton has also meticulously restored a number of the Lincoln stereoviews, an early form of 3-D photography. The restored and digitally colored stereoviews include the most recent discovery of President Lincoln apparently saluting during the procession at Gettysburg in 1863. Mr. Eaton described the Gettysburg picture saying: "The Library of Congress image was released in reverse and had confused many people as to whether it was Lincoln. In reversing it back and coloring the image, we clearly see Gettysburg in 3-D, as if we were there. The added dimension of color makes the difference." The updated image of the Gettysburg photo is publicly available at http://www.coloroflincoln.com.

The new "Color of Lincoln" photos have received high praise from the community of Lincoln scholars and authors. Dr. James Cornelius Ph.D., Curator of the Lincoln Collection at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library states, "Bryan Eaton's colorization of the Lincoln photographs stands as an excellent example of an 'a-ha!' moment of invention. We see his work and say to ourselves, 'Why didn't someone think of doing this sooner?' But no one had...I applaud his technical prowess, his organizational acumen, and his artistic aplomb in bringing Abraham Lincoln's immemorial visage into the 21st century." Dr. Ron Reitveld, Ph.D., professor emeritus at Cal State University Fullerton and Lincoln Scholar put it simply, "What a fantastic collection of Lincoln photos in color."

Bryan Eaton's artwork and the new publication of the book, "Color of Lincoln", brings a new dimension to the photographs of Lincoln while capturing the essence of Abraham Lincoln's tumultuous political career and intimate personal life. A supporting video documentary is also in production to be released during the Lincoln Bicentennial. Overall, the "Color of Lincoln" project presents a new perspective of Abraham Lincoln visually and anecdotally. It also answers the question of Lincoln's belief in an afterlife. The Gettysburg experience is captured from multiple eyewitness accounts describing the President's physical stance, delivery and Lincoln's emotional tears as he spoke the last words of the Gettysburg Address.

For more information or book pre-ordering details, visit http://www.coloroflincoln.com. Bryan Eaton may also be contacted for information and interviews at 650-862-8133.

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