American Brain Tumor Association Calls for Discovery Research

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Letters of intent due October 1, 2010

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Our goal is to look at brain tumors through new eyes. This grant provides the opportunity for scientists in fields such as bioengineering, math, computer sciences, biophysics and environmental biology to apply their knowledge to the brain tumor challenge.

The American Brain Tumor Association is seeking letters of intent for its 2011 Discovery Grant program supporting innovative and creative research ideas in brain tumor diagnosis and treatment.

The Discovery Grant Program offers one-year grants, not to exceed $50,000, for high-risk, high-impact projects that have the potential to change current diagnostic or treatment paradigms for adult or pediatric brain tumors.

Each year, approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with a primary brain tumor and more than 150,000 have cancer that spreads to, or “metastasizes,” to the brain.

“One of our goals is to look at brain tumors through new eyes, and this grant provides the opportunity for scientists in fields such as bioengineering, math, computer sciences, biophysics, and environmental biology to apply their knowledge to the brain tumor challenge,” said ABTA Research Director Deneen Hesser.

Eligible Discovery Grant researchers include advanced post-doctoral trainees, junior faculty, and principal investigators who have not received funding at the equivalent of a National Institutes of Health (NIH) RO1, or higher level. Qualified applicants must be planning to conduct and complete their research in the U.S. or Canada within the one-year funding period. Priority will be given to proposals that address underfunded areas of brain tumor research. Investigators from sciences outside traditional biology fields are encouraged to apply.

Projects will be pre-screened by letter of intent, due October 1, 2010. Letters of intent instructions are available at: http://www.abta.org/research_progress/297. Full proposals will be accepted by invitation only.

Last year, the inaugural year of the program, ABTA received 104 letters of intent from which 33 researchers were invited to apply for funding. Seven individuals were chosen as 2010 Discovery Research Grant Program awardees.

The Discovery Grant program is one of four ABTA research funding programs. The ABTA also offers Basic Research Fellowships, Translational Grants, and Medical Student Summer Fellowships.

Basic Research Fellowships are two-year training awards that support young researchers entering the field of brain tumor research. These $80,000 awards are payable over two years. Translational Grants help scientists to further develop research that is on the cusp of moving from the laboratory into patient testing. One year, $75,000 Translational grants often support the pre-clinical data that researchers need to collect before securing funding from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and/or other major funders.

Basic Research Fellowship and Translational grant applications will post at the ABTA Web site, in fall, 2010. Applications for those awards are due no later than January 7, 2011.

More information on the American Brain Tumor Association’s Research Awards Program is available at:
http://www.abta.org/Research_Progress/36.

Founded in Chicago in 1973, the American Brain Tumor Association was the first national nonprofit organization dedicated solely to brain tumors. Today, the American Brain Tumor Association is a leader in brain tumor research and patient information, education and support. Learn more at http://www.abta.org or 1-800-886-2288.

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Sheryl Cash
ABTA
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