Female Amputee Runner Finishes in 1st Place and Beats All Able-Bodied Runners at 24 hour Ultramarathon

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For the first time in the history of competitive running, a female athlete with a prosthetic leg has won the overall title in a race. On January 1st, 2010, below-the-knee amputee Amy Palmiero-Winters, an employee of a Step Ahead Prosthetics, took first place at the Arizona Road Racers "Run to the Future" twenty-four-hour ultramarathon. Running 217 laps of a certified six-tenths of a mile course over twenty-four hours, Amy completed 130.4 miles to place first among all runners, both male and female. Amy is the Director of Team A Step Ahead for A Step Ahead Prosthetics.

For the first time in the history of competitive running, a female athlete with a prosthetic leg has won the overall title in a race. On January 1st, 2010, below-the-knee amputee Amy Palmiero-Winters, an employee of a Step Ahead Prosthetics, took first place at the Arizona Road Racers "Run to the Future" twenty-four-hour ultramarathon. Running 217 laps of a certified six-tenths of a mile course over twenty-four hours, Amy completed 130.4 miles to place first among all runners, both male and female. Amy is the Director of Team A Step Ahead for A Step Ahead Prosthetics.

Starting at 9 a.m. on December 31, 2009 and finishing at 9 a.m. on New Years' Day at the Victory Lane Sports Complex in Glendale, Arizona, Amy beat the overall male winner by 14 miles and bettered the second-place female finisher by over 36 miles. Based on this performance, Amy qualified for the United States able-bodied 24-hour run team that will be competing at the world championship in Brive, France in May 2010. This is the first time an amputee runner will be running against able-bodied counterparts on a world championship team.

This amazing accomplishment caps off a very busy and successful year for Amy which included running five 50-mile trail runs as part of the North Face Challenge, two 100-mile ultramarathons which qualify her for the Western States Trail run in 2010, and fulfilling her requirements for the Adventure CORPS Badwater Ultramarathon. At the Heartland 100-mile trail run in Cassoday, Kansas, Amy finished first-place overall female, making her the first amputee to win a 100-mile race. For these endeavors, Amy was recognized by USA track and field as the athlete of the week in October. More recently, she was listed by the Washington Times as one of the top ten runners of the decade.

Amy stands apart from most other athletes - not because of her ability to win, but because of the disability she must overcome. She is a 37-year-old mother of two, coach, mentor, and became a below-the-knee amputee as the result of a 1994 motorcycle accident. Prior to losing her leg, she ran track in high school and completed the Boston Marathon in three hours and 16 minutes. Amy's athletic achievements have proven her ability to overcome adversity. She serves as a role model for many people disabilities and anyone else, able-bodied or not, who strive to overcome limitations. She has proven that despite physical challenges, family, and work commitments, if you believe that you can do something, you can.

Amy is a proud member of Team A Step Ahead, a team of amputee athletes from around the world who compete in events including the Hawaii Ironman Triathlon, multiple marathons, road races around the world, and the Paralympic Games. Team A Step Ahead's members have been very competitive against able-bodied athletes, placing and winning age group awards. These elite athletes hold or have held world records in the 100m, 200m, 400m, track and field events, marathons and triathlons. Athletes receive training from coaches, prosthetists and physical therapists that are experts in working with amputee athletes, including world-record-holding Paralympians. For additional information on Team A Step Ahead visit http://www.astepaheadonline.com.

Photos and Interviews available upon request.

Contact:
Phil Kreuter
516-681-3484

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