Newly Revised Short Story Series Sends Richard Dawkins, Antony Flew, Mother Teresa, and the Author Himself, to Heaven

A little over a year ago, author Anthony Horvath published a collection of short stories that proved controversial. In the announcement of his updated edition, Horvath answers critics and includes two short stories subjecting himself to the same scenario the rest of the named individuals go through.

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An Atheist that Gets to Heaven?

It is a mistake to think you can have good things without God, because on the Christian view, God is the source of those good things. Take away God, even at your own explicit request, those good things go with it.

(PRWEB) October 03, 2012

In 2011, author Anthony Horvath was thumbing through his collection of short stories and decided that three of them were themed closely enough that they would go together well as a Kindle edition. Without thinking much about it, he released the ebook on Amazon and other online retailers.

He had no idea what kind of uproar it would create.

Thanks to a particularly outspoken atheist, the short story series was soon the subject of fierce criticism. Thousands of visitors descended on Anthony's blog. In the mix of thoughtful feedback came physical threats, personal attacks, and other hostile reactions. In general, most people hadn't actually read the series to know if their outrage was justified. Even so, after things died down, Horvath thought about how best to respond to the critics.

"One of the complaints centered around the alleged unfairness of putting these public figures under the microscope while exempting myself. The accusation was also lodged that my series assumed Christianity was correct. Obviously, it would. Rather than write out a formal response I thought I would do it in the same way everything began, through stories," Horvath said.

For this reason, the updated edition includes two new short stories, both of which are titled "Anthony Horvath Goes to Heaven." One story proceeds on the assumption that atheism is true, while the other retains the assumption that Christianity is true. An essay explaining the addition of the stories is included, and this essay does to some extent more directly answer critics.

Horvath says, "One of the things that confused me was how some of the atheists howled with rage with how the Richard Dawkins of my story responded to his situation while other atheists not only agreed with me on how Dawkins would respond, but said they would do the same thing. That assures me that most fair-minded people, including atheists themselves, shouldn't find that story or my series objectionable in the slightest."

And what is the ultimate source of the misunderstanding? Says Horvath, "People forget that God as Christians understand him is not merely a transcendental entity, but also immanent. It is a mistake to think you can have good things without God, because on the Christian view, God is the source of those good things. Take away God, even at your own explicit request, those good things go with it. Like it or not, believe it or not, that is the Christian view. There is no sense in being offended by it."

To find out what all the fuss is about yourself, read the stories on Kindle the Nook, or on Kobo and Sony through Smashwords.


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