LASIK Surgeon Dr. Ashraf Was Recently Interviewed About the Number of Patients He is Seeing Who Request LASIK to Correct Vision Damage Caused by Excessive Computer Use

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Atlanta LASIK surgeon Dr. Ashraf has recently noted an increase in patients opting for LASIK surgery to correct weakened vision or myopia (nearsightedness) caused by too much time spent using a computer. These patients are suffering from Computer Vision Syndrome, a common catchall term for the myriad of symptoms and discomfort caused by excessive computer usage.

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There are a variety of stretches I recommend to my patients to combat eyestrain caused by a lot of computer use.

Dr. Farooq Ashraf, MD, FACS, was recently interviewed about the increase in patients visiting his Atlanta LASIK clinic complaining of symptoms relating to Computer Vision Syndrome. Dr. Ashraf has noted an increase in patients suffering from myopia and other common eye problems caused by spending too much time in front of a computer screen.

Computer Vision Syndrome is a catchall term used to simplify diagnosis of the myriad symptoms caused by excessive computer use. Patients may also experience dry, itchy or watery eyes since reading at close distances often reduces the blink rate which thus reduces tears spreading over and lubricating the eye. Frequent and extended computer use can also cause blurred vision, an inability to focus on the computer screen and even headaches. In addition eyestrain, increased nearsightedness and risk of glaucoma, computer use can also result in secondary problems such as head, neck and back pain caused by slouching or learning forward towards a computer screen.

Computer Vision Syndrome affects an estimated 150 to 200 million Americans, according to the US Census Bureau, and computer vision issues are ranked number one by OSHA on the list of health-related office complaints. Eyes are designed to focus on a variety of focal distances with a variety of properly aligned light sources. Unfortunately, computer usage doesn’t provide the variety and eyes also struggle with the light source of most computer screens. Today’s LCD monitors are often backlit with fluorescent lights, which is harsh on the eyes. Screens are also built to use very narrow bands of the visual spectrum. The light of a computer screen coupled with harsh artificial interior light (like overhead fluorescents) doesn’t provide a viewer’s eyes with the beneficial full spectrum daylight.

“There are a variety of stretches I recommend to my patients to combat eyestrain caused by a lot of computer use,” says Dr. Ashraf, medical director of the Atlanta Vision Institute. “There shouldn’t be any glare on the screen caused by lights, and there should be any other bright objects, like a window, directly in your field of view. Additionally, it’s important to take breaks. Every ten minutes or so, look away from your computer and let your eye muscles relax by focusing on something at least 20 feet away. Bigger breaks, including standing and stretching, should also happen at least once an hour.”

Dr. Ashraf is board certified and specializes in cornea and refractive surgery, including laser vision correction surgery. He completed his medical degree at the Medical College of Ohio and received advanced training in corneal and refractive surgery at Johns Hopkins. He has several office locations in the Atlanta, Georgia area including Johns Creek, Perimeter/Mt. Vernon and Decatur, as well as a vision clinic in Dubai, U.A.E. To learn more about the Atlanta Vision Institute and Dr. Ashraf, visit http://www.atlanta2020.com or call (770) 622-2488.

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Deedra Hughes
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