New Book "Pocket Neighborhoods: Creating Small-Scale Community in a Large-Scale World" By Ross Chapin with Foreword by Sarah Susanka

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The Taunton Press and architect Ross Chapin are pleased to announce the release of the new book "Pocket Neighborhoods: Creating Small-Scale Community in a Large-Scale World." With rising gas prices again and the trend toward smaller homes and “pooling resources,” as well concerns about job security and a general trend to live more meaningful lives, "Pocket Neighborhoods" is very timely and offers solutions for municipalities, developers and homeowners alike. In simple steps, informative vignettes and 220 photographs, Ross Chapin takes the reader through the process of designing, and creating an intimate, vibrant, healthy neighborhood with the kind of security that comes from people looking out for one another.

New book published by The Taunton Press "Pocket Neighborhoods: Creating Small-Scale Community in a Large-Scale World"
By Ross Chapin

New book published by The Taunton Press "Pocket Neighborhoods: Creating Small-Scale Community in a Large-Scale World" By Ross Chapin

"Pocket neighborhoods are for anyone who wants to live in a close, tight-knit neighborhood. An ever-growing segment of the population wants a stronger sense of community," said Ross Chapin, AIA, author of the new book "Pocket Neighborhoods."

The Taunton Press and architect Ross Chapin are pleased to announce the release of the new book "Pocket Neighborhoods: Creating Small-Scale Community in a Large-Scale World."

Why pocket neighborhoods? Why now? There has been a monumental shift in how Americans are thinking about most everything; one increasingly evident being the way people are re-imagining how they live in their homes and in their communities.

Pocket neighborhoods, best defined as clusters of homes gathered around a landscaped common area, are springing up all over the country. The people who live in these most sought-after communities know they share something extraordinarily valuable: a model of community that provides a missing link. They have their cherished privacy, but with something more: they get to know each other in a meaningful way, and are able to offer one another the kind of support system that family members across town, across state or across country cannot.

Sarah Susanka, in the foreword to the book said, “Every few years a book comes along that profoundly shifts the way we think about a subject, and when we look back a decade or so after its publication, we see a dramatic shift brought about by the thoughts that book contains. I believe that the book you have in your hands right now is such a game changer.”

Ross Chapin shares with us fascinating insights into the history of settlement and the precedents to pocket neighborhoods -- from garden cities, cottage courts, neighborhoods within neighborhoods, even floating neighborhoods, to co-housing, its Danish origins and the new urbanism and smart growth movements so popular today. Chapin shows the reader examples of pocket neighborhoods now emerging in suburban, rural and urban centers throughout America.

While most books in this field focus on house, gardening and décor, Chapin’s book puts a name to an essential building block of vibrant, healthy communities. In simple steps, informative vignettes and 220 photographs, Chapin takes the reader through the process of designing, and creating an intimate neighborhood without gates, but the kind of security that comes with people looking out for one another.

Perhaps the greatest beneficiaries of these small-scale communities are children, who need increasingly larger zones of play as they grow up. Pocket neighborhoods provide a protected, traffic-free environment for a child’s widening horizon — a place for unplanned play alone and with other children, and a place to have relationships with caring adults other than parents.

There is probably a pocket neighborhood tucked discreetly into some corner of your town, and another on the drawing board, as developers have realized that the scale and appeal of this setting represents a highly marketable opportunity for new construction today.

Chapin’s book offers a compelling vision that people of all generations have been thinking and dreaming about, yet until now have not had it described so clearly. This book will inspire a resurgence of vibrant, small-scale neighborhoods across the country.

Pocket Neighborhoods: Creating Small-Scale Community in a Large-Scale World
Publish date: March 15, 2011
Publisher: The Taunton Press
ISBN: 978-1-60085-107-0
Price: $30.00 U.S., $34.00 Canadian
Pages: 224
Photographs: 220
Cover: Hardcover with jacket
Trim Size: 9 x 9 ½
Web site: http://www.pocket-neighborhoods.net

About the author:
Ross Chapin, AIA, leads an architectural and planning firm near Seattle, Wash., and has been a development partner on six pocket neighborhood projects. These prototypes have received significant national media coverage, professional peer review, and numerous national housing awards. Additionally, Chapin has designed more than 40 neighborhoods across the U.S. from Washington to Indiana to New Hampshire for other developers.

Projects by his office have won numerous design awards including the 2005, 2007 and 2009 American Institute of Architects Housing Awards, and have been featured in Residential Architect, Builder Magazine, Planning Magazine, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, and more than 30 books, including Solving Sprawl, Superbia, Housing for Niche Markets, and Sarah Susanka’s Not So Big House series.

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