The Borgen Project Unveils 50-State Strategy Before U.N. Millennium Summit

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National campaign, based in Seattle will have professionals in all 435 congressional districts lobbying for the world’s poor and the achievement of the U.N. Millennium Development Goals

Clint Borgen (left), the President of The Borgen Project, meets with staff to discuss global poverty legislation.

We began a beta phase of the program in May and we already have Regional Directors operating in 55 cities across the U.S. We hope to be in every congressional district by March.

On Monday, 142 Heads of State, including President Obama, will meet in New York City for an emergency U.N. Summit. The topic? Cutting global poverty in half by 2015, as outlined in the U.N. Millennium Development Goals.

The Borgen Project, a Seattle-based advocacy organization, announced an aggressive, 50-state strategy to make sure every congressional leader is feeling pressure from constituents to achieve the U.N. Millennium Development Goals. The plan includes selecting and training volunteers in all 435 U.S. congressional districts who will serve as ambassadors for the world's poor.

“It’s ambitious but doable,” said Clint Borgen, President of The Borgen Project. “We began a beta phase of the program in May and we already have Regional Directors operating in 55 cities across the U.S. We hope to be in every congressional district by March.”

Borgen noted that congressional leaders tend to support poverty-reduction legislation when they receive calls and emails from people in their district. The Borgen Project’s Regional Directors are mobilizing these calls and emails behind crucial legislation aimed at improving living conditions for those living on less than $1 a day.

The Borgen Project will also utilize the organization's political access and meet with over 200 congressional offices in 2011. The Capitol Hill strategy will outline to each leader the return on investment their district has seen from past reductions in global poverty, both in terms of job creation and national security.

“Call it karma, but when the United States does good things for the world’s poor, the United States sees a big return on investment,” Borgen said. “Where people have been assisted from barely surviving into becoming bona fide consumers, it has opened new markets for U.S. companies and brought billions of dollars and thousands of jobs back to the United States.”

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