Gender Stereotypes Predict Top Career Choices on EQSQ.com

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A recent feature on EQSQ.com, a Web site exploring the Empathizing-Systemizing Theory as a career or study choice indicator, revealed that men and women choose careers that correspond to gender stereotypes. Women comprise 90 percent of the three top career choices for females and men comprise 85 percent of the three top male career choices.

An article on EQSQ.com, a Web site exploring the Empathizing-Systemizing Theory as a career or study choice indicator, revealed that men and women choose careers that correspond to gender stereotypes. Women comprise 90 percent of the top three female career choices and men comprise 85 percent of the three top career choices for males. Despite legislative efforts such as affirmative action to provide more employment opportunities to women, millions more women than men are still not working.

Historically, working women chose careers based on the jobs that were available to women. This meant that career choices were determined by gender. In 1961, President Kennedy established “affirmative action” aimed at increasing the employment of women and other underrepresented groups. Many states have adopted this practice, and some have passed laws prohibiting gender discrimination. According to EQSQ.com, despite 40 years of legislated opportunity to break down career stereotypes, women are still choosing "women's careers" and men continue to choose "men's careers."

“Secretaries and administrative assistants,” “elementary and middle school teachers,” and “registered nurses” are women’s top career choices, with 90 percent female representation. Men’s top career choices, employing 85 percent male workers, include “drivers/sales workers and truck drivers,” “first-line supervisors/managers of retail sales workers,” and “carpenters.” These findings are based on the most recent annual data available from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

As a footnote, EQSQ.com reports that less than half of women who could work are employed compared to the two-thirds of able men who are employed. In addition, unemployed married women outnumber unemployed married men by nearly two to one. They don’t regard themselves as part of the labor force. These statistics point to another stereotype; men work and women don't.

EQSQ.com presented this unusual twist on BLS labor force data as part of its mission to help people better understand themselves, and thus make more-informed career and education choices. Visitors can assess their Empathizing Quotients (EQ) and Systemizing Quotients (SQ) with an interactive personality quiz. Potential students and career-seekers/changes can use the results to help decide on the education program or career-path most suited to their personality. Although, in theory, more males than females tend to be systemizers and more females than males tend to be empathizers, sex is not a determining factor.

EQSQ.com centers on the Empathizing-Systemizing theory of the male versus the female brain types. The tests were developed by professors Simon Baron-Cohen and Sally Wheelwright at the University of Cambridge, England. Systemizers and empathizers can find information and resources around education, educational programs, and career choice.

Contact:

Katrina Boydon, Editor-in-Chief

EQSQ.com

775-321-3601

http://www.eqsq.com

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Katrina Boydon
EQSQ.com
775-321-3601
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