Reaction Monitoring of Processes Under Pressure Using In Situ Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR)

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Complimentary webinar explains the value of in situ mid IR reaction monitoring for promoting a detailed understanding of catalytic and other chemical reactions under pressure.

ReactIR 15 reaction analysis and reaction monitoring

METTLER TOLEDO invites you to attend a complimentary webinar presented by Dr.Will Kowalchyk Reaction Monitoring of Processes Under Pressure Using In Situ FTIR taking place on April 1, 2009.

Monitoring reactions under pressure poses many challenges. While monitoring reactions under pressure, it is often impossible to see into the reactor or process because the required pressure necessitates using a metal reactor instead of glass. It is difficult to know when the reaction is complete, much less being able to characterize the reaction kinetics. The accumulation of an unwanted or hazardous species is not uncommon. Taking samples for offline analysis (i.e. HPLC, GC, NMR) can introduce air or moisture into the reaction which can poison catalyst or the samples simply do not reflect the concentrations of the reactive species in their natural environment.

ReactIR™ real-time in situ Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) can provide a "molecular movie" of the chemical reaction under actual process conditions, including under high pressure. The functional group specificity of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) allows the simultaneous monitoring of many chemical species. Our range of probe technologies, specifically designed for pressure chemistry, allows reactions to be monitored to over 350 bar.

The Reaction Monitoring of Processes Under Pressure Using In Situ FTIR webinar will outline the relevant probe designs and technology for reaction monitoring at elevated pressure. Several pressure chemistry case studies will be presented including reductions (hydrogenation), oxidations, carbonylations, hydroformylations and reactions in supercritical CO2. Schematics and pictures of actual installations will be reviewed showing some very common ways to interface METTLER TOLEDO Comp™ probe technology into a process.

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Patricia Hicks
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