SellyourCell.com is Taking the Lead in Wireless Recycling

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SellyourCell.com is a leader in the rapidly growing industry of cell phone and wireless device recycling.

The response to our offer to purchase PDAs and iPods has been fantastic. Really. It seems like there was a certain pent up demand that we were able to satisfy when we added those to our mix. We’re very pleased that people are using us as a conduit for recycling those devices and not throwing them away

Electronic waste is a growing problem facing the United States, and old cell phones are no small part of that problem. There are an estimated 100 million used cell phones in the hands, kitchen drawers and closets of Americans. Often consumers hold on to the phones because they are not sure what to do with them. They know that their cell phone was expensive when it was new, and suspect it must still be worth something to somebody.

Fortunately, anyone who has felt this sentiment can visit http://www.sellyourcell.com to validate those suspicions. SellyourCell.com is a leader in the rapidly growing industry of cell phone and wireless device recycling. SellyourCell.com simply offers to buy old or used cell phones on its web site in 3 easy steps.

“We tried to make the site as simple as possible for people to use. I actually used my Dad as the model for the web site, figuring that if he could use it, anyone could,” SellyourCell.com CEO Keith Ori says with a smile.

Once you agree to sell your cell, Ori’s company sends you a postage paid box for you to return your phone in. Alternatively you can download one of their “Speedy-Ship” labels at the time you order and use your own box. Ori says that once they receive the phones it takes about 30 days for the customer to receive their check for the phones.

“We turn the phones around pretty quickly, so customers will frequently see their money faster than that,” Ori says.

Right now business seems to be going at a pretty good clip for http://www.SellyourCell.com. The startup dot com, founded by Ori in late 2003, is now a million dollar company, and Ori is making some pretty aggressive business moves- he recently increased the amount they are offering for more than half of the 600 phones they offer to buy. This is unusual because used phones, like most commodities, go down in value as they become less viable for use. Ori’s strategy is meant to increase market share over competitors offering less money, and it appears to be working.

“We have increased purchases, and therefore sales, an average of 20% per month since we started. I know that kind of growth is not traditionally sustainable, but we don’t see an end to it anytime soon.

Additionally, the demand to recycle a wider range of cell phones is being met by SellyourCell with an expanded range of offerings that not only includes many more phones, but also includes offers to purchase wireless PDA’s such as Palm Treos, RIM Blackberry devices, and even Apple iPods.

“The response to our offer to purchase PDAs and iPods has been fantastic. Really. It seems like there was a certain pent up demand that we were able to satisfy when we added those to our mix. We’re very pleased that people are using us as a conduit for recycling those devices and not throwing them away,” said Ori.

It seems like SellyourCell.com really is an idea whose time has come. It may seem odd that Americans now have so many cell phones that recycling venues are needed, but people probably once thought the same thing about glass bottles.

SellyourCell.com is a six-year-old subsidiary of Sundog Inc., based in Orlando, Florida. Sellyourcell.com offers to pay consumers to recycle their used cell phones through their website http://www.sellyourcell.com. This process eliminates a number of hazardous and harmful substances from coming into contact with the environment and provides a financial incentive for doing so.

http://www.SellyourCell.com is one of the oldest companies offering this service and continues to be a leader in the wireless recycling industry.

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Keith Ori
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