Advertising Agencies in China Industry Research Report - Now Available from IBISWorld

Share Article

With strong and steady economic growth over the past several decades, China has developed into the second-largest advertising market in the world. However, most companies in this industry are controlled by private owners with limited funds and market reach. Large advertising clients are more likely to choose large domestic companies with well-established networks, like Shanghai Advertising, or foreign-owned companies with extensive experience, design and innovation capabilities, such as Saatchi and Saatchi.

IBISWorld Market Research

IBISWorld Market Research

China has developed into the second-largest advertising market in the world.

With strong and steady economic growth over the past several decades, China has developed into the second-largest advertising market in the world. Over the past five years, revenue for the Advertising Agency industry in China has been growing 15.7% annually, says IBISWorld. The industry is set to generate $56.9 billion in 2012, up 16.6% from 2011.

Although the Advertising Agencies industry as a whole has maintained rapid growth, some localized advertising markets have become stagnant. This is due to local advertising companies being geographically scattered and small in scale. Most companies in this industry are controlled by private owners with limited funds and market reach, which contributes to the industry's low market share concentration level. Small localized firms are unable to provide the high-quality services generally required of this industry; large advertising clients are more likely to choose large domestic companies with well-established networks, like Shanghai Advertising and AVIC Culture, or foreign-owned companies with extensive experience, design and innovation capabilities, such as Saatchi and Saatchi and Leo Burnett.

With strong national policy support for the Advertising Agencies industry in China, revenue growth is expected to remain steady, says IBISWorld. Although new advertising channels such as search engines, websites and billboards have become growth points for the industry, TV advertising will continue to be the most important media due to its wide coverage and national reach.

For more information, visit IBISWorld’s Advertising Agencies in China industry report page.

Follow IBISWorld on Twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/IBISWorld
Friend IBISWorld on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/IBISWorld/121347533189

IBISWorld industry Report Key Topics

The Advertising Agencies industry in China creates advertising campaigns for clients and places these advertisements in periodicals, newspapers, billboards, shop windows, the internet, radio, television, airports, railway stations, bus shelters and other media. Firms provide a range of services, including consulting, creative talent services, advertising material production and media planning. This industry does not include video production or advertising models.

Industry Performance
Executive Summary
Key External Drivers
Current Performance
Industry Outlook
Industry Life Cycle
Products & Markets
Supply Chain
Products & Services
Major Markets
Globalization & Trade
Business Locations
Competitive Landscape
Market Share Concentration
Key Success Factors
Cost Structure Benchmarks
Barriers to Entry
Major Companies
Operating Conditions
Capital Intensity
Key Statistics
Industry Data
Annual Change
Key Ratios

About IBISWorld Inc.
Recognized as the nation’s most trusted independent source of industry and market research, IBISWorld offers a comprehensive database of unique information and analysis on every US industry. With an extensive online portfolio, valued for its depth and scope, the company equips clients with the insight necessary to make better business decisions. Headquartered in Los Angeles, IBISWorld serves a range of business, professional service and government organizations through more than 10 locations worldwide. For more information, visit http://www.ibisworld.com or call 1-800-330-3772.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Gavin Smith
Visit website