Reverse Climate Change - Arizona HVAC Company Reflects on the Global Challenge to Manage the Costs of Correcting Climate Change

Arizona-Based American Cooling and Heating HVAC Company Announces New Entry in the Global Warming Series - Reviewing Current Efforts to Reverse Climate Change

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Arizona Air Conditioning Service Center

“Words from Berlin suggest that a modest global investment in alternative energy resources can keep global warming in check. But what is the actual definition of "modest?" local American Cooling and Heating tech manager.

Phoenix, AZ (PRWEB) April 17, 2014

Due to increasing interest in global warming and the associated effects in climate change, American Cooling and Heating has determined to help expand public awareness of current discussions and concepts. This press release is one of several in the ACH Global Warming series.

A Global Effort To Reverse Climate Change

According to the UN Climate Change Panel, quick action can restrain the cost of managing global warming. Immediate changes to the process of how energy is manufactured can be accomplished within a reasonably modest price range. But IPCC chairman Rajendra Pachauri makes perfectly clear that the solutions must involve immediate and decisive action. The tools are at hand. Climate change can be reversed and without a major disruption of world economic systems. But today is the day for action.

Consisting mainly of CO2, the buildup of heat-trapping gases in the atmosphere comes mainly from the burning of fossil fuels. In the power sector, the use of coal has increased by 2.2 percent per year between 2000 and 2010. And the problem of Global Warming generates a catch-22 environment. As the global heat index rises, so too do the demands for air-conditioning and other cooling services, all of which require electrical energy as a power source.

Unless the world takes additional and appropriate measures, containment of emissions will continue to become more difficult. According to the IPCC panel, by the year 2100 the world will endure a 5 to 7 degrees Fahrenheit increase in temperatures.

The greatest part of the balancing load falls upon governments and energy providers. According to the IPCC, shifting energy resources from fossil fuels to low-carbon or zero-carbon resources can reduce the growth of power consumption by around 0.06 percentage points per year. It is a modest consumption rate that will work. Alternative sources for renewable energy include solar and wind power devices. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says that anything entailing a near quadrupling of low-carbon energy supply lines is welcome as a global economic opportunity. The IPCC is not calling for major changes. As mister Pachauri has stated in other news reports, “The loss in consumption is relatively modest.”

Opposite Views On Reversal of Climate Change Don’t Change Common Sense

Now the IPCC predicts a large-scale change in the fossil fuel investment quarter, a change that will drop by $30 billion annually even as investments in low-carbon resources expand by nearly $150 billion. And none of this takes into account the estimated $336 billion increase in energy efficiency applications that apply to the building, industrial and transport sectors.

On the other hand, oil and gas companies project a different viewpoint. So far as Exxon Mobil is concerned, adjusting for climate change is unlikely to greatly influence the sell of fossil fuels in any foreseeable near future (1).

Even in the Berlin climate change meeting, a dispute disrupted the flow of the discussion. Even as the evidence of climate change becomes indisputable, issues of cause, effect and management continue to trouble the “big” names in the discussion. Yet one matter remains primary on the board. According to the IPCC, time is running out, not for solutions but for cost-effect solutions. President of the Natural Resources Defense Council, Frances Beinecke, says that the solution “… requires decisive actions to curb carbon pollution — and an all-out race to embrace renewable sources of energy. History is calling."

Summer heat can trigger asthma attacks, migraine headaches and even dehydration. Climate change is raising the heat ceiling and forcing a global increase in the use of heating and cooling equipment. To learn more about the American Cooling and Heating global warming series, click here.

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