Pittsburgh’s Trusted Plumber Offers Expert Plumbing Advice on Installing A Standard Kitchen Sink Drain, Strainer and Custom Drain Details

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Mr Rooter Tip Of The Day: Regardless of which design suits your installation, always use fittings that thread directly on the strainer. Easy project for moderate expertise!

Clogged drains - Megan Beall- JP Beall - Mr Rooter Plumbing Pittsburgh

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Take the drains straight back to the wall with flexible elbows and keep it all back there – trap and everything. Supported against the wall, a hammer blow won’t make it leak.

Installing a Standard Kitchen Sink Drain

The drain system under the kitchen sink is typically tubular thin-wall pipe a little more than 1-inch in diameter. “It is assembled with plastic compression fittings,” says Bob Beall, master plumber and owner of the trusted Pittsburgh plumbing service, Mr Rooter. “The two most common configurations locate the P-trap on the end or in the center. The P-trap empties into the drainpipe entering the wall or floor,” says Beall. Both end and center drain fittings come threaded for either a direct connection to the strainer threads, or a slip-on connection to a short stand pipe between the fitting and strainer. “Always avoid the stand pipe configuration, it has a tendency to leak,” according to Mr Rooter the most referred plumber in the Northeast Ohio and Southwest Pennsylvania region.

“Regardless of which design suits your installation, always use fittings that thread directly on the strainer,” says Beall. If you have a choice between the two drain layouts, the end drain is the better of the two because it is less prone to clogs and leaks.

Mr Rooter Tip Of The Day

Tip #1 An end drain will have two pipes, one vertical and one horizontal. The bowl the the P-trap will go on will get the vertical pipe, the other bowl gets the horizontal pipe. Start by inserting one of the special gaskets with a flat on top onto the vertical T drain-to-strainer connection.

Tip #2 Fasten the vertical T loosely to the strainer.

Tip #3 Fit the horizontal pipe at its elbow with a flat-head gasket and at the other end with a slip nut and tapered gasket, dry fit the parts, cut the horizontal pipe to length if necessary, and install the horizontal pipe.

Tip #4 Once assembled, re-tighten all the wing nuts and slip a P-trap on the bottom of the drain.

Tip #5 Install a PVC trap adapter or a flexible trap adapter as a transition between the sink drainpipe and the main drain line.

Tip #6 The flexible model allows some give in the connection angle; the PVC adapter has to be installed at an angle that’s dead on the money.

Installing Kitchen Sink Strainers

“Install kitchen sink strainers either before or after you install the sink,” says Beall. Mr Rooter adds, that installing them first will prove somewhat easier because it requires less stooping.”

Tip #1 Start with a bead of silicone caulk around the strainer’s lip.

Tip #2 Push the strainer into the caulk (remove the excess later).

Tip #3 From underneath, insert the rubber gasket and cardboard washer, if any.

Tip #4 From on top, insert the open jaws of needle-nose pliers through the holes.

Tip #5 From underneath, tighten the nut with a spanner wrench with one hand while keeping the strainer from turning with the pliers.

Tip #6 If the strainer nut is designed for it, lock it with the supplied bolts.

“The problem with kitchen sink drains,” says Beall, “is that they are designed to leak. One bump on any of the slip joints, and the drips begin.” And of course, adds Mr Rooter, “sink drains are also made to obstruct everything stored under the sink.”

TRADE SECRET: There is a better way. Take the drains straight back to the wall with flexible elbows and keep it all back there – trap and everything. Supported against the wall, a hammer blow won’t make it leak.

Tip #1 Start by removing all the old drainpipes and throwing them away. Attach a flexible elbow to each strainer, and point these straight toward the back wall.

Tip #2 Dry-fit a PVC elbow to a 1 1/2-inch PVC pipe cut just long enough to fit in the flexible elbow and still leave the elbow against the wall. Point the PVC elbows at each other.

Tip #3 Assemble a double-Y fitting with street 45 fittings on each side. Slip a glue-in bushing with 1/2-inch female threads i the top for a dishwasher drain (a 1/2-inch nipple will screw into the fitting, and the dishwasher drain will attach to that).

Tip #4 Slip the double-Y assembly directly against the back wall between the two PVC elbows, connecting them with two short PVC pipes.

Tip #5 Out of the bottom of the double-Y, fit a small length of 1 1/2-inch PVC as a connection for a schedule 40 P-trap.

Tip #6 Once all the fittings dry-fit together nicely, glue them and the strap then against the wall. Connect the P-trap into the house drain.
There’s A Reason They Call Us Mr.™

Debra Santavicca PR, SMM, WebIT

Mr. Rooter Media Center
724-553-9510
http://www.rooter2.com

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Rooter (Pittsburgh)

Robert A. Beall
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