Optimization and Scale-up of a Hydrodynamically Limited Anti-Solvent Crystallization Process: From Lab to Plant

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This two part Optimization and Scale-up of a Hydrodynamically Limited Anti-Solvent Crystallization Process: From Lab to Plant webinar series is based on an award winning paper presented at the 16th International Process Development Conference. The webinar series focuses on a semi-quantitative method for the optimization and scale-up of hydrodynamically limited antisolvent crystallization process. This protocol combines in situ Process Analytical Technologies (PAT) with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to facilitate the production of a knowledge based scale-up strategy for this mixing limited crystallization process.

Crystallization scale-up

Part 1 of the Optimization and Scale-up of a Hydrodynamically Limited Anti-Solvent Crystallization Process webinar series takes place on September 24 and presents this optimization protocol. Certain attributes of turbulent mixing have been identified to greatly impact key crystallization characteristics, such as the metastable zone width (MSZW), primary and secondary nucleation events, growth and agglomeration rates. This section focuses on the use of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in understanding these common industrial crystallization challenges and in turn facilitates the production of methods for the scale-up and scale-down of this process.

Part 2 of the Optimization and Scale-up of a Hydrodynamically Limited Anti-Solvent Crystallization Process webinar series, on October 1, takes the developed protocol to a scale-down and scale-up environment and demonstrates how crystal nucleation, growth and dimension can be maintained on scale. This approach highlights the necessity for a link to be forged between crystal size, form, kinetics, etc. and the attained mixed environment. In turn, a platform is produced to facilitate the right first time crystallization scale-up, tech transfers and scale-down assessments of this hydrodynamically limited process.

The webinar presenter, Mark Barrett, received his Ph.D. from University College Dublin (UCD) in Ireland, where he also studied Chemical Engineering. His thesis work focused on crystallization development and scale-up. Previously, Mark worked for Schering-Plough as a Process Development Engineer. Mark is now a Senior Research and Development Engineer at the Solid State Pharmaceutical Cluster (SSPC), based in Ireland.

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Patricia Hicks
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